Mental Health

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Everyone has a story.

The longer my life goes the more I'm learning that you only really understand your story. And that story changes and evolves everyday. It's still your narrative and your perspective, but it changes and you're more aware of how what you do affects other people.

Most of all certain parts of your story are private, you (and your loved ones) have a right to keep certain things to yourself. The whole world doesn't need to know everything about you. That goes for everyone even people in high profile public positions.

Think we would all be better people if we took that into consideration before casting judgment towards others. We're all trying to do the best we can in the situation we're in. We've all got duties and responsibilities. People that we care about and love. That we just want to share our energy and time with. Things we need and want to do. And it's impossible to do everything single thing we want without hurting other peoples emotions and feelings.

As rugby league fans, we're so lucky though that we can watch our team play every week. Back in 1993, when I started watching, it was one game on Friday night (delayed by an hour), one game on Saturday afternoon (on ABC) and one hour highlights of a game on Sunday night. We now get every single game live, English Rugby League, NRLW and curtain raiser games as well (NSW and QLD Cup). The results the last two years haven't been great on the field, but I'm optimistic and positive that we'll be back up competing for preliminary finals again soon. And even if we don't we can still talk to anyone wearing rugby league merch about how great the game is (most of the time).

Hope everyone has a good day.
 
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BOZO

Journey Man
Tipping Member
There are always a heap of comments on here re players and the fact they should feel “lucky” to get paid to play the game

This was something from Ange P during the week talking about a player who had struggled


The same player this week scored an equaliser then set up a match winner (after this press conference).

For me there is always so much more going on than what we see / hear about especially when we are talking about young men.
Mental health Perspective

Lifes adversities does not prejudice any one at any age , any gender , or any statues
Some have the ability to cope and others do not and need a strong support base whether it would be friends, family or faith .
No one knows how strong they are until they are truly tested


And to all my feathered friend fckers out there ...
our biggest test is yet to come
Wishing you all the best :h:
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maxta

First Grader
Premium Member
This is an issue beyond rugby league on a Global scale and with the pressures of everyday life effects all of us to a degree....in fact those it does not effect, are likely effected more as they hold it in.
To those doing it tough here on Silvertails, sincere well wishes and stay strong, personally have had a few obstacles myself and it's not a pretty place.
There's no "perfect" answer to it, but personally I find the best way to cope is training, music, friends, family and simply knowing the clouds will shift, but again probably not hit levels of many in deeper places.....so maybe an ignorant post on my part, but NEVER give up on yourself and have belief things will get better....
 

Rorz

Member
This is an issue beyond rugby league on a Global scale and with the pressures of everyday life effects all of us to a degree....in fact those it does not effect, are likely effected more as they hold it in.
To those doing it tough here on Silvertails, sincere well wishes and stay strong, personally have had a few obstacles myself and it's not a pretty place.
There's no "perfect" answer to it, but personally I find the best way to cope is training, music, friends, family and simply knowing the clouds will shift, but again probably not hit levels of many in deeper places.....so maybe an ignorant post on my part, but NEVER give up on yourself and have belief things will get better....
I’ve had tough mental challenges and it’s not pleasant ,but was fortunate enough to overcome them.Just remember this “you are not on your own”
 
mental health is an issue that has for so long been stigmatised. Whether it's cultural, lack of education on this issue and awareness. For so long it's been thought of a weakness, associated with negative qualities of an individual's constitution. We are taught to push these feelings down, ignore them, told to harden up. People suffering from this affliction need lots of love, support and understanding. Unfortunately many people cannot grasp or understand the depth of anguish and struggles that people with mental illness go through on a daily basis unless they have been through something similar or have had someone close to their hearts go through this. it's very important to reach out to friends, family who are struggling and offer support and for those who are struggling to also reach out and build a support network. Together we can all make a difference.

love to all my brothers and sisters on silvertails.
 

Dion Johnson

Bencher
Premium Member
Tipping Member

They strapped me to a stretcher and Tasered me’: Crichton opens up on mental health battle
On the eve of the NRL season, Sydney Roosters star Angus Crichton sheds light on a harrowing journey that has been the talk of rugby league for the past 18 months.

Angus Crichton could hear the sirens blaring. Fighting as he was being strapped to an ambulance bed.

“The police had just Tasered me,” he said. “They strapped me to this stretcher and Tasered me. Imagine if you had a bunch of policemen and paramedics trying to strap you to a bed for what you thought was no reason. You’d be like, ‘What the hell is going on’.

“What I didn’t realise at the time was that my dad had called them because he was scared.”


To understand the situation that left those close to Crichton fearing they had lost the man they once knew, you have to go back to the Rugby League World Cup in Manchester at the end of 2022.

Crichton was excelling for the Kangaroos under the bright lights of the world stage, but behind closed doors he was beginning to unravel.

I had the highest of highs, winning the World Cup,” the Roosters forward says. “After that, it all just boiled over. In typical male fashion, I was trying to convince myself that, ‘I’m fine, I’m fine, I’m fine’. But I wasn’t.

“It makes me a bit emotional talking about it now because it’s something I haven’t ever spoken about to anyone publicly.”

At a cafe in West Beverly Hills on Tuesday morning, sipping an iced Americano, Crichton begins to share the details of an episode that, until now, has been kept strictly private between him, his family, his manager and a select few trusted figures at the Roosters.

“It’s time to talk about it,” Crichton says as he contemplates his next words. “I don’t want sympathy. I’m not doing it because I want people to feel sorry for me. I always knew when I was undergoing treatment that I would have my time to say my piece and explain what happened to me.

“Bringing it up is a bit of a risk, to rehash old wounds, but if I can verbalise it in a way that can not only help people but explain to people what I went through and where I am now, that will be a positive outcome for me.

“It’s emotional. It’s like ripping a scab off an old wound. But it does feel good to give some air and tell people my story. It might be a different story when this gets published and it comes out, but I’m ready for that.”

When this masthead first approached the Roosters after learning of Crichton’s predicament last January, the club read out a letter from a doctor raising concerns for his safety if the story made its way into the public domain.

But by then, alarm bells had been ringing for some time among those who no longer recognised the person that stood in front of them.

A few weeks after the World Cup, as many players set off on European holidays, Crichton was unwillingly brought to a psychiatric facility by local police in the south of France.

Angus Crichton on his comeback to the NRL.

Angus Crichton on his comeback to the NRL.CREDIT: GETTY

Crichton had been staying in Pau with a close friend, who raised concerns with the back-rower’s family that he was acting out of character.

Crichton isn’t proud of the events that followed and eventually led to French police forcibly restraining him and taking him to a nearby mental facility.

The police and medical staff were convinced Crichton’s behaviour was the result of a reaction to alcohol or a particular substance, but toxicology reports came back clean.

It was widely assumed – and circulated in text messages across rugby league circles at the beginning of last year – that Crichton had “fried his brain” on magic mushrooms while in Amsterdam in the days leading up to his arrival in France.
Crichton doesn’t deny taking the substance in Amsterdam, but says the correlation made between the drug and his mental deterioration was inaccurate.
“It’s called a manic episode,” Crichton, who was later diagnosed with bipolar disorder, said.
“I was just manic. I wasn’t sleeping. I wasn’t thinking clearly or making good decisions. No one got hurt, no one got injured, but I was super energetic and very different to my normal self.
Angus Crichton playing for the Roosters.

Angus Crichton playing for the Roosters.CREDIT: GETTY
“When I was in Amsterdam, nothing happened in terms of a reaction. We had a great time. When I was in France, I was sober. I wasn’t even drunk. I had no substances there at all, but that was when the wheels started to fall off a bit.”
Crichton was prescribed sedatives at the clinic which, he says, delayed his recovery.

The facility wouldn’t release him, nor was he permitted to leave the country without a medical professional providing assurances he was fit to travel and with sufficient support, given the state he was in.

Crichton’s parents then flew to France with a psychologist, checking him out of the clinic and booking him on the first plane back to Australia.

For the next couple of months, Crichton received treatment in mental health facilities as he experienced different stages of mania.
Manic syndrome is a symptom of bipolar disorder and is marked by feelings of euphoria, hyperactivity, risk-taking, delusions, fixations and sleeplessness.
When treating bipolar disorder, it’s common for professionals to undertake months of testing and monitoring to determine the right medication and dosage.

Crichton wasn’t responding to the medication he was taking. His physique was also posing significant challenges, with his body metabolising the medicine quicker than the average person.

What he needed was outside the medical scope. His mental state continued to deteriorate as word began to spread of his condition.

“I had the outside world trying to figure out what the hell was going on with me,” he said.

“It became a bit of a circus. People creating ridiculous rumours. I heard about the text messages. It was crazy. A lot of it wasn’t true and it was tarnishing my reputation. It was some of the most far-fetched things.

“I can tell you now, I haven’t put on a Souths shirt since I left the club. Saying that I rocked up to training in a Souths jersey asking where Madge [former Rabbitohs coach Michael Maguire] was. That just flat out didn’t happen.”

Angus Crichton during his time at the Rabbitohs.

Angus Crichton during his time at the Rabbitohs.CREDIT: GETTY


The hard part for those who cared for Crichton was his inability to recognise that he needed the help they sought for him.

There are four stages of mania; hypomania, acute mania, delusional mania, and delirious mania.

On some occasions, when Crichton didn’t take his medication, he would enter the highest stages of mania, fixating on bizarre issues which would bend his concept of reality.

When he returned to training, it was under the strict guidance of the club’s medical and support team, who quickly noticed that the increased physical and aerobic workload boosted his metabolism.

With each relapse, he would return to the clinic in the hope of altering and adjusting his medication and dosage to find the right balance.

“People wanted to constantly stay at my house with me,” he said. “They wanted to come over and make sure I was taking medication.

“I had to FaceTime them and prove I was taking my medication. That was at a time when I was saying, ‘I don’t need to take medication. I don’t want to take medication’.”


Fearing for his wellbeing and safety, Crichton’s family and manager made a pact – if he did not video call them to prove he’d taken his medication by midnight each day, they would be forced to call the police.

Which brings us back to the night he was forcefully strapped to an ambulance bed and taken to a mental rehabilitation clinic.

His father, Charlie, fearing the worst for his son, couldn’t contact him. His manager, David Rawlings, also tried without luck. Motivated by love and overwhelmed with fear, Charlie called the police on his own son.

“It’s taken for me to get to where I am now to realise that I actually did need to be protected from myself,” Crichton said.

“I needed help. The toughest thing was gaining everyone’s honest trust and belief back. I think everyone was so on edge for a long time after that.”

As much as everyone tried to shield him from the world, the plight of Angus Crichton became the subject of rumour and innuendo in rugby league

I even had South Sydney fans messaging on social media checking up on me,” Crichton said of the supporters of his former club.

“Rugby league fans in general are amazing. I was also supported heavily by the Roosters and my teammates. I was very fortunate. But there were times I just felt like it was never going to end. I just wanted it all to go away.

“I would walk down the street and I knew people were looking at me, and they’d be whispering. Every single person I had a conversation with were like, ‘How are you, how actually are you?’ I still get it now.”

NRL chief executive Andrew Abdo would check on his welfare. Immortal Andrew Johns was also touched by Crichton’s situation.

“Having Joey Johns there meant a lot to me,” he said. “I spoke to him a fair bit. He would come and visit me, we’d go for coffee. He could relate a bit to what I was going through. He spoke to me about some of the stuff he’d gone through.

“He told me that he didn’t want to leave the house because you feel like everyone is talking about you. We went through similar things.”


Teams will always talk about the importance of a good pre-season. Crichton’s 2023 pre-season consisted largely of riding an exercise bike at the rehab clinic.

Two weeks after he was given clearance to check out of the facility, Crichton was back playing rugby league in front of a packed crowd against the Dragons on Anzac Day.

Angus Crichton on his return to the NRL on Anzac Day last year.

Angus Crichton on his return to the NRL on Anzac Day last year.CREDIT: GETTY

“I was racing the clock to try and come back and play footy,” he said. “I was doing my own pre-season training while locked in a facility. Looking back at it now, it’s almost a joke. It’s laughable what I was trying to do. I was a long way off being ready to play when I came back last year.

“I only realise that now. I feel like it built character and tested me, but I look back and ask if I even should have been doing it.”

Roosters coach Trent Robinson treads carefully when quizzed on Crichton’s wellbeing.

His $700,000 World Cup-winning back-rower was a shadow of the person that he last saw before boarding a flight to the United Kingdom, and he was unsure if he would see that person again.

“I was asking that question, I didn’t know what to think,” Robinson said.

Daniel Tupou and Angus Crichton share a moment on the field during Magic Round in Brisbane.

Daniel Tupou and Angus Crichton share a moment on the field during Magic Round in Brisbane.CREDIT: GETTY

“It was so difficult and unique, and you just have to deal with the person in front of you. That was really tough for Angus. There was a six-month period there where he really struggled as he worked through things in the right way with the support of the family and club.

“When he came back, he didn’t have the foundation of work that he wanted. He was working his way back through footy, but always from the right place. That’s why it’s amazing to see where he’s at now. It’s a credit to him and it’s a bit of a shining light.

“It was such a personal battle that played out publicly because this is what we do. But he’s handled it incredibly well, and the players really supported him and handled it well. He’s come back to a strong place, fitness wise, strength wise and mentally.”


Crichton is entering the final season of his contract with the Roosters. He knows, given the emergence of young guns such as Siua Wong and Naufahu Whyte, his time at the Tricolours is likely coming to an end.

It’s why the Roosters were willing to release him from the final year of his deal to fulfil a desire to play rugby union.

Negotiations were being driven by former RA chairman Hamish McLennan who, when criticised for making such an audacious and lucrative play for Crichton, had a dramatic change of heart and pulled the deal.

Rawlings described negotiations as “bad business” after the two-year contract worth up to $1.6 million was taken off the table after two-and-a-half months of back and forth between the parties.

“I think I was used. I think they used me to get some exposure and interest,” Crichton said. “To be honest, when it fell through, I was a bit relieved. I’ve always been open about going back to rugby and it’s something I want to do at some point in my career, but I want to finish my Roosters career on my own terms.”

Angus Crichton during the last World Cup.


Crichton, who was a shock absentee from the Roosters team named for the opening game of the season against the Broncos in Las Vegas, has attracted interest from overseas rugby union clubs.

He’s in the best physical shape of his career and is now in non-medicated remission.

“For the amount of stress everyone was going through – family, friends, players, teammates – it feels good now to be able to say, ‘Just look at me, I’m fine’, and people actually know that, ‘Wow, he’s doing well’.

I’m definitely a more resilient person for what I went through. I can’t thank my family, my partner, my friends and my teammates [enough] for what they’ve done for me. I went to hell and back and come out the other side more open-minded, more understanding and probably more emotionally in touch with myself.

“I’ve definitely grown through this period. I have a lot of empathy for a lot of people now. I’ve always seen the good in people but I see it at a whole new level now.

And if my time at the Roosters is coming to an end, I want to leave with people thinking, ‘That Angus Crichton is a bloody good player’. I’m working to get that. I’m working to put a bit of respect back on my name.”​

 
I put my hand up I been here.
5 weeks ago I spent 2 weeks in a private mental health clinic, 44 put feeling aside separated from wife for second time in 10 years been together 24 years. Hit me for 6, but I had to do it last time I drank myself silly and did not improve me nor take time out.
It's okay to not be okay, blokes need people to talk to.
Thanks for sharing, not something a weaker man would, or could do, but no judgement cast on any who'd prefer to keep their battles private. Strength isn't character, strength is finite and like anything can be depleted. And the good thing is character can always be replenished and built upon but never chipped away at.

Best of luck, @winnyason.
 
It's a Matty John's regular trope but it's true, 'there's magic in sweat' I've heard it expressed more poetically and as something to do with salt water, (tears, sweat, the sea) but a lot of men don't get the exercise and physical exhaustion they secretly crave from jobs that are conversely made to keep them fit to employ without over taxing their limits.

And most of the really good blokes I know will sacrifice an hour of running or heading to the gym for precious home time with family ten times out of ten.

You just need to be selfish three times out of ten because the rewards are never self evident.

And sadly the commodification and corporate commercialisation of fitness has made that seem the antithesis of being a good family man (in whatever guise that takes) for many.

But it's true, there is magic in sweat.
 

BOZO

Journey Man
Tipping Member
But it's true, there is magic in sweat.
Good morning feathered friend @Top End Eagle . I hope you are loving your self and looking after your self

The key word to your post is Magic and magic only happens when we put in the effort and make it happen

We all need to make an effort towards our mental and physical health
Make the effort to Eat a well balanced diet
Make the effort to exercise
Make the effort to stop and avoid substances that will make us sick in the head and in the body
Make the effort to regularly see our health specialists
Make the Effort to regularly take our medication
last but not least
Make the effort to do happy things like going to watch Manly Win Live and lift our spirits

The Moral of the story
Magic only Happens when we make the fcking Effort !

Manly Making Magic happen in Vegas
1709764790975.png
 
Good morning feathered friend @Top End Eagle . I hope you are loving your self and looking after your self

The key word to your post is Magic and magic only happens when we put in the effort and make it happen

We all need to make an effort towards our mental and physical health
Make the effort to Eat a well balanced diet
Make the effort to exercise
Make the effort to stop and avoid substances that will make us sick in the head and in the body
Make the effort to regularly see our health specialists
Make the Effort to regularly take our medication
last but not least
Make the effort to do happy things like going to watch Manly Win Live and lift our spirits

The Moral of the story
Magic only Happens when we make the fcking Effort !

Manly Making Magic happen in Vegas
View attachment 26261
I love you too mate.
 

Ryan

Journey Man
Good on him for opening up about MH. Only through communication, validation, reassurance and support can people fight through what is a very difficult time in history to deal with things.

Being in the football arena, and a celebrity perrsay, he'd probably have a rheem of people lining up to help him. The difficulty (like Matt Lodge really) would be ascertaining who the real support is versus those just wanting to hop on the gravy train.

The funny thing about life, is you can never tell what people are truly going through and struggling with. Even those on social media that portray absolute happiness and balance as a persona.

For that reason, as I'm getting older, I keep that in mind, even when I'm meeting someone for the very first time. Everyone deserves to be treated properly, regardless of who they are and what they may say at times.
 

NREagle

Bencher
Premium Member
Tipping Member
Good on him for opening up about MH. Only through communication, validation, reassurance and support can people fight through what is a very difficult time in history to deal with things.

Being in the football arena, and a celebrity perrsay, he'd probably have a rheem of people lining up to help him. The difficulty (like Matt Lodge really) would be ascertaining who the real support is versus those just wanting to hop on the gravy train.

The funny thing about life, is you can never tell what people are truly going through and struggling with. Even those on social media that portray absolute happiness and balance as a persona.

For that reason, as I'm getting older, I keep that in mind, even when I'm meeting someone for the very first time. Everyone deserves to be treated properly, regardless of who they are and what they may say at times.

So true.

The best decision I made was reaching out to you @Ryan
 

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