Club News 2022

First Grader
From the SMH. You can tell it’s an amalgam of two separate reports:

From the Archives, 1972: Manly wins first-ever grand final

Champagne flowed for Manly’s Sea Eagles after their historic 19-14 win over Easts in the Rugby League grand final. But their victory was not entirely sweet, with two Manly tries hotly disputed.​

By Peter Allen and Alan Clarkson​

September 16, 2022 — 12.00am

Edited version of two stories published in The Sun-Herald on September 17, 1972
Champagne flowed like water after Manly stormed to a memorable 19-14 win over Easts to win their first-ever Rugby League grand final yesterday.
“This picture shows the intensity of the rugby league final at the SCG yesterday between Eastern Suburbs and Manly. The big fellow carrying the No. 11 guernsey is East’s Artie Beetson.” September 16, 1972.

“This picture shows the intensity of the rugby league final at the SCG yesterday between Eastern Suburbs and Manly. The big fellow carrying the No. 11 guernsey is East’s Artie Beetson.” September 16, 1972. CREDIT:STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

A jubilant Manly secretary, Mr Ken Arthurson, said after a match full of fire and excitement: “It’s a dream come true.

“We’ve been waiting 25 years for this.”

Manly, beaten in five previous grand finals, has been trying to win the premiership since they entered first grade in 1947. Easts, both courageous and luckless in defeat, were also trying to win their first grand final since 1945.

The teams served up typical grand final football - tense and bruising with bursts of brilliance that had the big crowd of 54,000 people roaring with approval. The crowd was about 6,000 smaller than expected.

Many turned up at the SCG, but after seeing the crush, returned home to watch the match which was shown live on TV. Nor did the expected beer-can throwing incidents on The Hill eventuate.

“The football kept them interested this time,” said a police spokesman.
Was it a try? Manly skipper Freddie Jones is hurled back from the tryline by Easts forwards Laurie Freier and Arthur Beetson (11), while the ball (arrowed) remains over the line.

Was it a try? Manly skipper Freddie Jones is hurled back from the tryline by Easts forwards Laurie Freier and Arthur Beetson (11), while the ball (arrowed) remains over the line. CREDIT:STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

It was a match that could have gone either way at half-time when the score was 4-all. A battered Manly captain, Fred Jones, who scored his team’s hotly disputed first try, said later: “When we went to a 9-4 lead I thought we had them.
“We were easing down at the finish.”
Easts were far from humbled.

Both teams had chances
Both Manly’s second half tries, which led to their battling 19-14 win over Eastern Suburbs, were hotly disputed after the match. Claims were made that Manly skipper Fred Jones had dropped the ball before grounding it and that Ray Branighan’s try should not have been allowed because of a forward pass.

To add further spice to the sensational aspects of the match, referee Keith Page twice ruled “no try” when Eastern Suburbs players went over.
Manly captain and hooker Fred Jones is chaired from the field by teammate Bill Hamilton. 16 September 1972.

Manly captain and hooker Fred Jones is chaired from the field by teammate Bill Hamilton. 16 September 1972.CREDIT:STAFF

Double movement
Page ruled that prop John Armstrong had made a “double movement” when he crossed 12 minutes before half-time. Easts at that stage were clinging to a 4-2 lead. Then when they trailed 4-8 after 15 minutes of the second half, their rangy captain, Ron Coote, desperately dived for the line in the last-ditch tackles by Graham Eadie and Mal Reilly.

Page ruled that Coote had dropped the ball before he grounded it. And this ruling was unhesitatingly backed up by Coote after the match. I had grave doubts about both Manly tries.

From where I was sitting Jones seemed to drop the ball as he reached around the posts to score. And the pass from full-back Graham Eadie to prop Bill Hamilton seemed well forward. Branighan, who took Hamilton’s pass, nearly gave the chance away when he stopped and looked around as if expecting the whistle to blow.
A rooster wanders on to the ground before the 1972 rugby league grand final between Manly and Easts at the SCG. 16 September 1972.

A rooster wanders on to the ground before the 1972 rugby league grand final between Manly and Easts at the SCG. 16 September 1972.CREDIT:STAFF

He quickly accelerated through when nothing happened and touched down. As the crowd left the ground yesterday, arguments raged over what would have happened had those tries been disallowed. Manly - Warringah are the Rugby League champions although their win at the SCO yesterday was shrouded in controversy.

Manly had an 8-4 lead when Jones crossed for his try after 18 minutes of the second half and they were starting to take control of the game.
I haven’t the slightest doubt that Manly were the true winners of this premiership. They were the real professionals of the match. They had two chances and they crossed the line twice and were awarded two tries.

Eastern Suburbs had six chances in the game and they finished with two tries. And that, very simply, meant the difference between winning and losing the grand final.

RELATED ARTICLE​

Sayer throws punch, NSW vs England, 3 June 1962.

Flashback

From the Archives, 1962: Six sent off in “wild” league game

That, and the fact that Manly’s triumphant skipper, Fred Jones, won the second half scrums by the massive margin of 8-2.

This giant share of possession in the second half and a little of Mal Reilly’s magic helped put Manly firmly in command. Manly won the premiership . . . or Easts lost it?

That is just one more question that can be debated over the outcome of this match.
 
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The Incomparable Immortal Bob Fulton
From the SMH. You can tell it’s an amalgam of two separate reports:

From the Archives, 1972: Manly wins first-ever grand final

Champagne flowed for Manly’s Sea Eagles after their historic 19-14 win over Easts in the Rugby League grand final. But their victory was not entirely sweet, with two Manly tries hotly disputed.​

By Peter allen and Alan Clarkson​

September 16, 2022 — 12.00am

Edited version of two stories published in The Sun-Herald on September 17, 1972
Champagne flowed like water after Manly stormed to a memorable 19-14 win over Easts to win their first-ever Rugby League grand final yesterday.
“This picture shows the intensity of the rugby league final at the SCG yesterday between Eastern Suburbs and Manly. The big fellow carrying the No. 11 guernsey is East’s Artie Beetson.” September 16, 1972.

“This picture shows the intensity of the rugby league final at the SCG yesterday between Eastern Suburbs and Manly. The big fellow carrying the No. 11 guernsey is East’s Artie Beetson.” September 16, 1972. CREDIT:STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

A jubilant Manly secretary, Mr Ken Arthurson, said after a match full of fire and excitement: “It’s a dream come true.

“We’ve been waiting 25 years for this.”

Manly, beaten in five previous grand finals, has been trying to win the premiership since they entered first grade in 1947. Easts, both courageous and luckless in defeat, were also trying to win their first grand final since 1945.

The teams served up typical grand final football - tense and bruising with bursts of brilliance that had the big crowd of 54,000 people roaring with approval. The crowd was about 6,000 smaller than expected.

Many turned up at the SCG, but after seeing the crush, returned home to watch the match which was shown live on TV. Nor did the expected beer-can throwing incidents on The Hill eventuate.

“The football kept them interested this time,” said a police spokesman.
Was it a try? Manly skipper Freddie Jones is hurled back from the tryline by Easts forwards Laurie Freier and Arthur Beetson (11), while the ball (arrowed) remains over the line.

Was it a try? Manly skipper Freddie Jones is hurled back from the tryline by Easts forwards Laurie Freier and Arthur Beetson (11), while the ball (arrowed) remains over the line. CREDIT:STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER

It was a match that could have gone either way at half-time when the score was 4-all. A battered Manly captain, Fred Jones, who scored his team’s hotly disputed first try, said later: “When we went to a 9-4 lead I thought we had them.
“We were easing down at the finish.”
Easts were far from humbled.

Both teams had chances
Both Manly’s second half tries, which led to their battling 19-14 win over Eastern Suburbs, were hotly disputed after the match. Claims were made that Manly skipper Fred Jones had dropped the ball before grounding it and that Ray Branighan’s try should not have been allowed because of a forward pass.

To add further spice to the sensational aspects of the match, referee Keith Page twice ruled “no try” when Eastern Suburbs players went over.
Manly captain and hooker Fred Jones is chaired from the field by teammate Bill Hamilton. 16 September 1972.

Manly captain and hooker Fred Jones is chaired from the field by teammate Bill Hamilton. 16 September 1972.CREDIT:STAFF

Double movement
Page ruled that prop John Armstrong had made a “double movement” when he crossed 12 minutes before half-time. Easts at that stage were clinging to a 4-2 lead. Then when they trailed 4-8 after 15 minutes of the second half, their rangy captain, Ron Coote, desperately dived for the line in the last-ditch tackles by Graham Eadie and Mal Reilly.

Page ruled that Coote had dropped the ball before he grounded it. And this ruling was unhesitatingly backed up by Coote after the match. I had grave doubts about both Manly tries.

From where I was sitting Jones seemed to drop the ball as he reached around the posts to score. And the pass from full-back Graham Eadie to prop Bill Hamilton seemed well forward. Branighan, who took Hamilton’s pass, nearly gave the chance away when he stopped and looked around as if expecting the whistle to blow.
A rooster wanders on to the ground before the 1972 rugby league grand final between Manly and Easts at the SCG. 16 September 1972.

A rooster wanders on to the ground before the 1972 rugby league grand final between Manly and Easts at the SCG. 16 September 1972.CREDIT:STAFF

He quickly accelerated through when nothing happened and touched down. As the crowd left the ground yesterday, arguments raged over what would have happened had those tries been disallowed. Manly - Warringah are the Rugby League champions although their win at the SCO yesterday was shrouded in controversy.

Manly had an 8-4 lead when Jones crossed for his try after 18 minutes of the second half and they were starting to take control of the game.
I haven’t the slightest doubt that Manly were the true winners of this premiership. They were the real professionals of the match. They had two chances and they crossed the line twice and were awarded two tries.

Eastern Suburbs had six chances in the game and they finished with two tries. And that, very simply, meant the difference between winning and losing the grand final.

RELATED ARTICLE​

Sayer throws punch, NSW vs England, 3 June 1962.

Flashback

From the Archives, 1962: Six sent off in “wild” league game

That, and the fact that Manly’s triumphant skipper, Fred Jones, won the second half scrums by the massive margin of 8-2.

This giant share of possession in the second half and a little of Mal Reilly’s magic helped put Manly firmly in command. Manly won the premiership . . . or Easts lost it?

That is just one more question that can be debated over the outcome of this match.
Fred Jones ...
“When we went to a 9-4 lead I thought we had them.
“We were easing down at the finish.”

A jubilant Manly secretary, Mr Ken Arthurson, said after a match full of fire and excitement: “It’s a dream come true.
“We’ve been waiting 25 years for this.”

In conclusion
The Roosters seemed to think Manly was lucky
But Champions make their own luck and Winners are Grinners

Our Winning and Grinning Godfather
See the source image
 
The Incomparable Immortal Bob Fulton
How did I know you would follow up with an Arko reference?
Birds of a Feather Feathererd friend
We have been in the same nest for quite some time now
And we know each other very well
And even though some times we cannot live with each other
The fact is we can not live without each other as well
Luv Yah Tezza ! :h:
 
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Reserve Grader
 
Journey Man
Nice. I wish more of his teammates cared as much about the club, which has turned its back on him.
 
Journey Man
Heard a whisper from a mate, that we are trying to play Melbourne Storm in Chicago round one 2023.

Not sure if this is common knowledge, or if I'm ruining upcoming news.
 
Sea Eagle forever
Just wondering how everyone's feeling knowing that this potential team is running around with other clubs and it wouldn't have broken the salary cap to have them all.
1. Gutherson
2. Suli
3. Ramien
4. Hiku
5. Hopoate
6. Foran
7. Hynes
8. AFB
9. Api
10. JWH
11. Lane
12. Davey
13. Garner

14. Verills
15. ZDC
16. Cust
17. Hastings
18. Taupau
19. Knight
 
Sea Eagle forever
Heard a whisper from a mate, that we are trying to play Melbourne Storm in Chicago round one 2023.

Not sure if this is common knowledge, or if I'm ruining upcoming news.
Would make sense considering our history of idiotic decisions to take one of our highest rating and highest crowd drawing games away from Brookvale. Who needs home ground passion and hatred from it's supporters. Fuk me dead.
 
First Grader
Premium Member
At least we would stuff Melbourne's early season as well as our own.
Although knowing how things work, the storm would fly back nice and comfy in first class, and we would be in cattle class.
 
Journey Man
Would make sense considering our history of idiotic decisions to take one of our highest rating and highest crowd drawing games away from Brookvale. Who needs home ground passion and hatred from it's supporters. Fuk me dead.
Chicago is almost a home game for Mr Penn.
 
Journey Man
One less games for us season ticket holders I guess. Then there's the magic round, where of all clubs, it's Manly who puts their hand up to play Brisbane in Brisbane as OUR home game. Then there's the country game to Mudgie. That, on top of a god awful product at home. FMD. Lucky I consider it a donation only. And that's because of the players / coaches past (including Des, but not anymore) who had heart, spirit, passion, dedication for this club.
 
The Incomparable Immortal Bob Fulton
Lucky I consider it a donation only. And that's because of the players / coaches past (including Des, but not anymore) who had heart, spirit, passion, dedication for this club.
Players and Officials come and go

But the soul and spirit of the club are the fans and club members like your good self feathered friend Ryan

Keep up your loyalty ,spirit and dedication for our Legendary club

And also keep up with your constructive criticism so you can keep the Bastards Honest when our club fails to meet finals standards
 
Journey Man
Players and Officials come and go

But the soul and spirit of the club are the fans and club members like your good self feathered friend Ryan

Keep up your loyalty ,spirit and dedication for our Legendary club

And also keep up with your constructive criticism so you can keep the Bastards Honest when our club fails to meet finals standards

Mate, I don't even expect or demand finals (not with this roster). Just improvement, and I'm happy. We need.to be realistic, and just hope we don't get the spoon next season given the current mob representing our club both on and off the field.
 
Team P W L PD Pts
24 20 4 306 42
24 18 6 209 38
24 17 7 272 36
24 16 8 119 34
24 15 9 247 32
24 15 9 201 32
24 14 10 130 30
24 14 10 63 30
24 13 11 -36 28
24 12 12 -100 26
24 9 15 -105 20
24 7 17 -192 16
24 6 18 -205 14
24 6 18 -290 14
24 6 18 -292 14
24 4 20 -327 10
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