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Aussie Test Squad

Discussion in 'Cricket Forum' started by Chip and Chase, Oct 31, 2012.

  1. Chip and Chase

    Chip and Chase True Supporter Staff Member Administrator Premium Member 2016 Tipping Competitor

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    No real surprises there. Wade over Haddin is justified in my book, so let's move on. Haddin has played some good games for Aust, but a dip in form and an unfortunate personal tragedy left the door ajar for Wade and he has grabbed it. Brad will be able to make a reasonable living from T20 over the next few seasons.

    Squad is

    Michael Clarke (capt), David Warner, Ed Cowan, Shane Watson, Ricky Ponting, Mike Hussey, Matthew Wade, James Pattinson, Peter Siddle, Mitchell Starc, Nathan Lyon, Ben Hilfenhaus (12th man to be named).

    Also you'd have to think that this puts a line through Mitchell Johnson's test career unless there are some injuries or a massive form reversal. Cowan will be given a couple of tests one would imagine, but if no big score arrives he may be in danger. I wonder if Cummins will get a shot this summer ? or is still under injury management workload ?

    I'm really looking forward to this test series against the Saffers. They are the best side in the world and are quality with both bat and ball. Their pace bowling attack is phenomenal and if they fire our top order are in for a nightmare summer.
     
  2. Kiwi Eagle

    Kiwi Eagle Moderator Staff Member 2016 Tipping Competitor

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    So who are the guys putting pressure on the batsmen ?

    Have seen the likes of Hughes, Khawaja and Smith come and go, they still next on the ranks or more a Forrest type player ?
     
  3. Fro

    Fro Well-Known Member

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    the Jury is still well and truly out as far as the next in line batting wise Kiwi.

    Hughes has scored a few in the one dayers for SA, but nobody is really putting big numbers up in the Shield.

    Ponting is the top scorer, Cosgrove is up there but will never be picked if he doesnt drop 30kg.

    Ferguson is doing ok, and Henriques seems to have turned a bit of a corner in his game, so will be interesting to see how he develops. (but not this season), Steve Smth has gone backwards, and is playing as a batsman, and Mitch Marsh has seemingly gone off the rails.

    Forrest may well do a Steve Bradbury and get in as nobody else is doing anything.
     
  4. Kiwi Eagle

    Kiwi Eagle Moderator Staff Member 2016 Tipping Competitor

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    How is Baileys record in the longer game ? Had never really heard of him prior to being 20/20 captain.

    Had forgotten about the 2 Marsh's actually. Seem to be high hopes for Mitch

    Seems the days are gone of blokes having to post massive numbers over 3-4 seasons to get a look in like days gone by
     
  5. Titans Fan

    Titans Fan Member

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    this series is crunch time for Cowan.
     
  6. Volley

    Volley Well-Known Member

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    I don't rate Cowan, but it's only crunch time if someone can start delivering at Shield level. Unfortunately, no-one is.

    Bailey's a plodder. If only Martin Love or Bev came around now rather than 10-15 years ago. Wasted talent.
     
  7. Chip and Chase

    Chip and Chase True Supporter Staff Member Administrator Premium Member 2016 Tipping Competitor

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    There is a list a mile long of quality players that couldn't crack the Aussie Test side because of the top shelf team we had for a decade or more.

    Anyway I see that Mr Fragile has broken down again and will probably miss the first test at least. Rob Quiney has been pencilled in for a test debut. Haven't seen a lot of this guy outside of last years Big Bash, where he looked pretty good I must admit. Hopefully he'll take his opportunity, got a solid 80 against the Saffers for Aust A over the weekend.
     
  8. Fro

    Fro Well-Known Member

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    Yeah Quiney has been there or thereabouts for a while.

    wont play 100 tests, but not the worst they could have come up with.
     
  9. Kiwi Eagle

    Kiwi Eagle Moderator Staff Member 2016 Tipping Competitor

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    Really looking forward to this series. This current South Africa side is probably up there with my favourite team ever to watch

    Am a huge Steyn fan, so reading about his last spell in that warm up match has me quite excited about seeing if he carries that through into the test, it sounded vicious
     
  10. Volley

    Volley Well-Known Member

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    Warner, Cowan & Quiney has got to be the worst Top 3 in Australian test cricket history.

    Quiney's a good 20 & 50 over bat, but at Test level? We're screwed.
     
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  11. Kiwi Eagle

    Kiwi Eagle Moderator Staff Member 2016 Tipping Competitor

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    That top 3 and 2 37yo blokes in the middle order could be extremely vulnerable against this attack
     
  12. Chip and Chase

    Chip and Chase True Supporter Staff Member Administrator Premium Member 2016 Tipping Competitor

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    Rick Darling, Bruce Wood and Graham Yallop ??

    Quiney might go alright, let's give him a chance, not the worst batsman going around. Not sure that first drop is the spot for a test debut against this attack though. Big ask, especially if there is an early wicket, but having said that, he has spent plenty of time as an opener. Maybe Pup will step up a place or two ?? Could we see Punter return to 3 ??
     
  13. The Eagle

    The Eagle Well-Known Member

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    Warner has had a few good scores
    Cowan is the boring sponge we need
    Who the **** is Quiney?
     
  14. Fro

    Fro Well-Known Member

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    Who is Bruce Wood?
     
  15. Chip and Chase

    Chip and Chase True Supporter Staff Member Administrator Premium Member 2016 Tipping Competitor

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    LOL.

    Bruce is Graeme's brother. Right hand bat, but an even worse runner between wickets.

    It was a Freudian slip, I was thinking Bruce Laird and Graeme Wood, but then remembered Rick Darling.
     
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  16. Kiwi Eagle

    Kiwi Eagle Moderator Staff Member 2016 Tipping Competitor

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    Good article here http://www.espncricinfo.com/australia/content/current/story/590131.html

    Where have all the batsmen gone?

    The Sheffield Shield used to be a factory for producing Test-ready batsmen. But a combination of green seaming pitches and flawed techniques has resulted in the cupboard becoming alarmingly bare

    Brydon Coverdale

    November 6, 2012


    Seven years ago this week, a 30-year-old Michael Hussey walked out on to the Gabba to make his Test debut. He was well prepared. Hussey had accumulated 15,313 first-class runs at an average of 52.80 before he was handed a baggy green. On Friday, Rob Quiney will make his Test debut at the same venue. He too is 30. But he will embark on Test cricket with only 3092 first-class runs to his name, at an average of 37.70.

    That is not to disparage Quiney's selection. Two consistently strong Sheffield Shield seasons made him the best man to replace the injured Shane Watson. And he is far from alone: Ed Cowan and Shaun Marsh both averaged less than 40 at first-class level when they made their Test debuts. David Warner, Usman Khawaja and Phillip Hughes had better figures, but were picked after relatively little first-class cricket.

    Whichever way you spin it, things have changed dramatically from the days when the Test selectors could look at Sheffield Shield cricket and see mountains of runs being piled up by Darren Lehmannn or Brad Hodge, Justin Langer or Jamie Siddons, Matthew Elliott or Martin Love. Or Michael Hussey. It is a shame for Chris Rogers and David Hussey that their best seasons came when Australia's batting line-up was more settled.

    When John Inverarity's panel searched for Watson's replacement, they saw that Khawaja has been stalling after promising starts, Hughes continues to tease but has a chequered Test past and Marsh has been dropped to club cricket. Tasmania's Alex Doolan, who made 162 against the South Africans for Australia A at the weekend, and Queensland's Joe Burns are two to watch. But the first-class batting cupboard is alarmingly bare, as evidenced by the fact that the 37-year-old Ricky Ponting is the leading Shield run scorer this season.

    So where have all the young batsmen gone?

    There is no question that the standard of domestic pitches around the country has played a part. Michael Hussey returned to the Sheffield Shield last week and was alarmed at how difficult the conditions were at the MCG. So far this season, the Sheffield Shield has produced 20 completed innings in which teams have scored less than 250. There have been only 13 totals of 250-plus.

    The last men to make 1000 runs in a Sheffield Shield season were Rogers and Michael Klinger, who both achieved the feat four years ago. Quiney went close last summer, when he scored 932 runs, and Cowan accumulated 921. In Hussey's eyes, those performances were the equivalent of 1200-run summers a decade ago.

    "It was pretty different," Hussey told ESPNcricinfo of last week's Shield game. "The conditions were pretty conducive to seam bowling. Certainly when I was growing up the pitches were a lot truer and a lot better for batting, so as a batsman 1000 runs was a good benchmark and if you got to that you knew you'd had a good season. But I think that has certainly lowered in the last few years.



    I'm concerned that batters aren't learning to bat for six hours and construct long innings and concentrate for long periods of time Michael Hussey



    "I'm a bit concerned, to be honest. It seems like the nature of pitches around the country are really result-based. I'm concerned that batters aren't learning to bat for six hours and construct long innings and concentrate for long periods of time."

    Hussey's worries go even further. If life for the batsmen is so difficult, then it also creates a false sense of achievement for young fast bowlers. And on seaming wickets, young spinners are left feeling irrelevant.

    "I'm concerned that we're not allowing spinners to develop because spinners aren't even required because seam bowlers do the job and have a better chance of getting the wickets," Hussey said. "And I'm even concerned about preparing seam bowlers for Test cricket, because the margin for error is so big, they just have to lob the ball somewhere up there and it will do a fair bit and they're going to pick up their wickets. [But] in Test match cricket you've got to be very patient, very disciplined for long periods of time. I'm a little bit concerned that we're not developing players and skills for Test match cricket."

    Hussey is not alone in his assessment of domestic surfaces. This week, South Australia's coach Darren Berry voiced his concerns that pitches were being tailored towards results instead of towards providing an even contest. And the Australia coach Mickey Arthur was upset conditions for the most recent Shield match in Hobart were so seam-friendly that the offspinner Nathan Lyon, who must this week bowl to the South Africans in a Test match, was barely used.

    "We've been disappointed [with Shield pitches]," Arthur said. "When you see Shield games going two and a half days, it's not great. It was disappointing for us when our spinner, who could play in the Test match, bowled three overs in the game. I know that this issue is being addressed at a higher level."

    But the lack of big runs is not all down to the pitches. As Quiney and Cowan have shown, there are runs available if a batsman possesses the technique and is prepared to work hard. Last year, Ponting questioned the techniques of the emerging crop of domestic batsmen and said many were "nowhere near what they need it to be to play Test cricket". Earlier this year, Rogers analysed the techniques of several of the country's Test batting candidates and found plenty of problems. Rogers, Ponting and Hussey all know what it takes to bat for a full day and come back the next morning hungry for more runs. Between them, they have scored more than 60,000 first-class runs. Their credentials are impeccable.

    Brad Hodge fits that category as well. For 16 years, he piled up runs at first-class level until one day, playing for Victoria in a Shield match, he was facing the second new ball and knew that his job was to get through until stumps. But within two balls he had driven the fast bowler Peter George for a massive six over long-on. Hodge made 195 in that innings, but knew he no longer possessed the discipline for the long format. Now he makes his living exclusively as a Twenty20 player. The format has been good to him, but he fears it has been detrimental to the development of young batsmen.



    I think the IPL changed the way young people thought, what they wanted to do and what they wanted to achieve Brad Hodge



    "I think the game dramatically changed the day the IPL came in to the system," Hodge told ESPNcricinfo while watching last week's Sheffield Shield match at the MCG. "I honestly believe that. I think it changed the way young people thought, what they wanted to do and what they wanted to achieve. To be honest, you can play in the IPL and your technique doesn't have to be 100% up to the standard of a Test match player, and get away with it and make a lot of money doing so."

    Some batsmen have made their name in T20 and still developed into Test players. Warner is one, Quiney another. Others have slipped by the wayside. Others still are young enough to make the transition over the coming years. It was fitting that shortly after Hodge spoke of batsmen being geared to Twenty20, he would have seen Mitchell Marsh throw his wicket away for 2 from 6 balls, throwing the bat at a wide ball from Peter Siddle.

    Hodge, speaking before Quiney's call-up to the national squad, said the lack of batting depth had become such that if a batsman like Ponting were to suddenly be injured and miss the next Test, there was not an obvious replacement knocking down the door.

    "There was a time when you could say someone could come in and do an 80% job of what Ricky can," Hodge said. "I reckon you'd be saying someone could do a 50% job now. There's just no one out there screaming absolute talent. Phil Hughes is one who is good, I think he's a real good player. Khawaja is good but inconsistent at this level. You need consistency at this level and he's lacked that.

    "You're going to get found out for sure. When you're picking guys with an average of 30, you're going to get an average of 30 in Test match cricket. You're not going to get 50. Guys average 30 at this level for a reason. They've got flaws in their technique. Until guys start making 1000 runs, you're never going to be sure of any guy in the competition."

    But if nothing else, the past few months have shown that there are at least some batsmen to watch. One of those is Joe Burns, who made an unbeaten 74 for Australia A on their tour of England this year and averages 45.71 in first-class cricket. An organised, well-rounded player who notably is yet to play Twenty20 cricket, Burns has made 116 and 64 in his last two Shield games. He is one of the young batsmen who have impressed Victoria's coach Greg Shipperd over the past couple of years.

    "I'm impressed with Alex Doolan's technique, he looks like a very pure, technical player," Shipperd said. "I like the look of him. Joe Burns' weight of runs is starting to open people's minds about him. Hughes of course this year has made some runs and he's still such a young player, so he will have plenty to offer going forward. They're probably the three best young players, and Khawaja is another."

    But there are few others who have made compelling cases for Test consideration. And if domestic pitches remain treacherous and techniques flawed, don't expect Hussey-like figures any time soon.

    Brydon Coverdale is an assistant editor at ESPNcricinfo. He tweets here
    RSS Feeds: Brydon Coverdale

    © ESPN EMEA Ltd.
     
  17. Chip and Chase

    Chip and Chase True Supporter Staff Member Administrator Premium Member 2016 Tipping Competitor

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    Good article and a lot of truth to it. The same could be said of test wickets, they are generally result orientated preparations as well. It's what brings the crowds in. Matches that peter out to draws aren't very exciting for a spectator point of view, nor conducive to day 5 ticket sales.

    I don't think there is anything wrong with attacking batting at Test level. Guys like Hayden, Gilchrist, and Ponting made a career of it and revolutionised the way test cricket was played. They put Australia into winning positions many a time with a whirlwind knock. Be interesting to see how long Warner can last on eye alone though.
     
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  18. Fro

    Fro Well-Known Member

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    that would be a sight to see......a worse runner between the wickets than him. :)
     
  19. Chip and Chase

    Chip and Chase True Supporter Staff Member Administrator Premium Member 2016 Tipping Competitor

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    Looking forward to this first session. Not long now.
     
  20. The Eagle

    The Eagle Well-Known Member

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    Oh ****tle how I loathe you and your soul patch
     

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