Origin 1 - 2024

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Who will win?

  • NSW

    Votes: 9 42.9%
  • QLD

    Votes: 9 42.9%
  • Don’t care…

    Votes: 3 14.3%

  • Total voters
    21
  • Poll closed .

Mark from Brisbane

“ Boomer still Booming”
Premium Member
Tipping Member
Must say I’m far less invested in SOO these days than I used to be.

Of course I’ll watch it ( from somewhere in the NT on our way to WA) and hope for a Blues win but since moving to QLD almost 20 years ago I now realise there’s a difference between the Maroons & their fans AND the Blues & their fans.

Every single Queenslander becomes totally feral over the next month or so , they are just so invested in their team , even the ones that usually support AFL or one of the other sports.

Shops dress up in their colours , they start flying flags on their cars / trucks , it’s wall to wall and inescapable.

This transcends to their team , and doesn’t matter who is chosen they’ll almost all die for their brothers in arms.

It’s one of the reasons why they’ve been just about unbeaten in a series for the last 15 years ( yes I know they’ve lost a couple but that’s only been when they lost some of their big names to injury ).

It used to be a war , but then the game changed and now it’s just “ another game “ albeit with the best v the best.

I just don’t see the Blues having the same passion and never say die spirit.

And then there’s the affect on the teams and the competition.

I’d much prefer it to be one game , held mid season , on a stand alone weekend.

Indigenous v Māori ( Friday night )
Ladies SOO ( Saturday night )
QLD v NSW ( Sunday night )

Won’t happen but I can dream I guess.
 

Eagle 1

First Grader
Must say I’m far less invested in SOO these days than I used to be.

Of course I’ll watch it ( from somewhere in the NT on our way to WA) and hope for a Blues win but since moving to QLD almost 20 years ago I now realise there’s a difference between the Maroons & their fans AND the Blues & their fans.

Every single Queenslander becomes totally feral over the next month or so , they are just so invested in their team , even the ones that usually support AFL or one of the other sports.

Shops dress up in their colours , they start flying flags on their cars / trucks , it’s wall to wall and inescapable.

This transcends to their team , and doesn’t matter who is chosen they’ll almost all die for their brothers in arms.

It’s one of the reasons why they’ve been just about unbeaten in a series for the last 15 years ( yes I know they’ve lost a couple but that’s only been when they lost some of their big names to injury ).

It used to be a war , but then the game changed and now it’s just “ another game “ albeit with the best v the best.

I just don’t see the Blues having the same passion and never say die spirit.

And then there’s the affect on the teams and the competition.

I’d much prefer it to be one game , held mid season , on a stand alone weekend.

Indigenous v Māori ( Friday night )
Ladies SOO ( Saturday night )
QLD v NSW ( Sunday night )

Won’t happen but I can dream I guess.
Will never happen, it's also a massive cash cow for the NRL to fill it's coffers.
 

BOZO

Journey Man
Tipping Member
Every single Queenslander becomes totally feral over the next month or so , they are just so invested in their team , even the ones that usually support AFL or one of the other sports.
Shops dress up in their colours , they start flying flags on their cars / trucks , it’s wall to wall and inescapable.
This transcends to their team , and doesn’t matter who is chosen they’ll almost all die for their brothers in arms.
It’s one of the reasons why they’ve been just about unbeaten in a series for the last 15 years
You summed up the Superior Maroon Spirit very well feathered friend
The Maroon Passionate, Die Hard, Never Surrender DNA is a Myth according to the Blues
But the Maroons Never stop Believing and Keep on Winning

The Maroons Bleed and Believe in their Winning Legacy
How Proud must it be for DCE to lead his Great Maroon Men to Victory
1717207585246.png
 

Eagle thru 'n' thru

Reserve Grader
You summed up the Superior Maroon Spirit very well feathered friend
The Maroon Passionate, Die Hard, Never Surrender DNA is a Myth according to the Blues
But the Maroons Never stop Believing and Keep on Winning

The Maroons Bleed and Believe in their Winning Legacy
How Proud must it be for DCE to lead his Great Maroon Men to Victory
View attachment 27194
This is the one and only time that I'll be a online troll.

QLD=BOOOO!
 

Terry Zarsoff

First Grader
On the news last night I spotted ex-Manly hooker Charlie Haggett, accompanying Dylan Edwards to his specialist’s appointment. Charlie was back with the Sea Eagles for a time, c.2016. Then he left again. Wonder why?

Meanwhile Frank Ponissi is the NSW team manager. He is the best in the business and of course like Haggett, another Manly junior.

Also in the NSW camp is Peter Cox, a leadership coach who assisted Hasler, when Manly won its last two premierships.

Other people recognise the talent that comes out of the Manly organisation, not just of the on-field variety.

Pity then that Manly-Warringah’s periodic off-field disarray since the Superleague War, sees us losing such talent to other sporting organisations.

Edit: I notice former Manly team doctor, Dr Nathan Gibbs, is also in still with the Blues’ camp.
 
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Terry Zarsoff

First Grader
From Billie Eder and Emma Kemp at the SMH. Standby for a longish article:

Can you turn the nicest guy in rugby league into an Origin captain?​

By Billie Eder and Emma Kemp
JUNE 1, 2024

Jake Trbojevic will captain his first Blues side in game one on June 5.

Jake Trbojevic will captain his first Blues side in game one on June 5. CREDIT: NRL PHOTOS

In December 2022, Jake Trbojevic earned himself theoretical recruitment to the army. Anthony Seibold, fresh in Manly’s coaching chair and keen to rebuild some collective resilience in the aftermath of Des Hasler’s sacking, chaperoned his new squad out to a deserted spot in the NSW bush near Mudgee and handed them over to former Special Forces commanders.

What followed was a three-day boot camp that drove the players to exhaustion. They completed endurance strength activities designed to break them down physically, hiked carrying 20kg packs and 20-litre water jerry cans, were tested by cognitive-based challenges like orienteering while sleep- and food-deprived, and dragged a five-tonne truck half a kilometre.
Manly players drag a five-tonne truck, loaded with another two tonnes of equipment, through the bush near Mudgee.

Manly players drag a five-tonne truck, loaded with another two tonnes of equipment, through the bush near Mudgee.CREDIT: CAMERON DOYLE

After it was done - once the men had hit what they thought was their ceiling and then smashed through it - the commanders voted for the player they believed displayed the attributes required to make the cut as a real-life soldier.

“And they said, hands down, Jake Trbojevic was the man of the camp,” says Seibold. “They said if he was part of selection then he would be recruited. That’s him. He’s just one of those guys who just deals with adversity. He’s just got that mental toughness, and that’s pretty much what they saw there.

“They didn’t know a whole heap about footy, and they didn’t know too much about Jake and his story. But for them to identify him probably just shows what we see in him - and what the NSW selectors have seen in him.”

At the time, Sea Eagles captain Daly Cherry-Evans said he was glad to have completed one of the notorious camps “but if there’s another one I might retire”. That is retrospectively enlightening, given Cherry-Evans is widely accepted as Queensland’s established State of Origin captain while the rugby league world appeared so perplexed over Trbojevic’s appointment as his club teammate’s NSW counterpart.

One element was the shock that Michael Maguire had axed James Tedesco, the Blues’ skipper since 2020. But the consensus also seemed to be that Penrith co-captain Isaah Yeo was the obvious alternative. Maguire called Yeo “a born leader” and duly made him vice-captain. As far as Trbojevic goes, apart from standing in as Manly captain a handful of times, the 30-year-old’s only experience came as a teenager when he skippered the Mona Vale Raiders.

It was more than that, though. Trbojevic is just so … nice? Can a front-rower who apparently whispers “sorry” to opponents he tackles too hard also have the gravel to galvanise a team? Is rugby league’s Guy Smiley, universally adored for his trademark thumbs-up, capable of giving a thumbs-down if necessary? More pertinently, perhaps, does he even need to be?
Jake Trbojevic with his brother Tom and a signature thumbs-up after a victory in Mudgee in 2021.

Jake Trbojevic with his brother Tom and a signature thumbs-up after a victory in Mudgee in 2021.

Pat Cummins would have experienced a similar reaction when he was named Australian Test captain in 2021. Taking into account the differences between the two sports, including questions around whether a fast bowler could also see the full game-management picture, Cummins was also more wholesome than his predecessors.

In some ways, given Sandpapergate and Tim Paine’s sudden departure amid a sexting scandal, this was manna from heaven. But a cleanskin climate change advocate burdened with such heavy historical baggage on the eve of a partisan Ashes series was also viewed as somewhat unorthodox.

By November of last year, Cummins had led Australia to the World Test Championship, two retentions of the Ashes urn and the ICC World Cup trophy. Of his 43 matches as captain, the 31-year-old has lost only nine - six Tests and three ODIs. Cummins may never attain the tactical nous of Ricky Ponting, but does it matter if Ponting describes his leadership as “almost faultless”?
Pat Cummins was seen as an unorthodox choice for the Australian Test captaincy but has proven himself.

Pat Cummins was seen as an unorthodox choice for the Australian Test captaincy but has proven himself.CREDIT: GETTY

Captaining a team in any sport is a delicate remit. Not quite a coach; more a first among equals. It is a role tempered by myriad variables: the make-up and culture of the squad, its personalities, past results, present and future expectations, the state of the other lot (in this case, Queensland).

There’s also the desired direction of the coach to consider. “Someone like Jake, he represents where I want to start on our journey with the team,” Maguire said on Monday, hours after dropping his captaincy bombshell.

“I’ve watched Jake for such a long period of time and he wears his heart on his sleeve, and I think that resonates with our people in NSW … I can’t wait to sit next to him, he’ll probably show emotion at times, and he’s a character. And I want that in my captain, to show people what this jersey really means.”

It feels pertinent that Maguire spent much of that press conference emphasising the more emotive elements of Origin. Ideology has consistently made the Maroons more than the sum of their parts, and Billy Slater and the coaches before him have been good at tapping into the ideals and mythology of the jersey. It is why Queensland thrive on the underdog tag (even when they are not underdogs) and emerge victorious from tight games.

This context makes Trbojevic’s installation all the more interesting and suggests reputation does not always accurately reflect the full picture. The Sea Eagles’ The Manly Way documentary shows glimpses of his capacity for talking to teammates in huddles and meetings and communicating clearly and with feeling.

“Sometimes his competitiveness probably gets lost because he is such a good person when people meet him or interview him or see him around the community,” Seibold says.

“He’s a very humble guy, but he’s one of the most fierce competitors that I’ve coached. I put him in the bracket along with guys like Sam Burgess for how hard they compete, and you underestimate him at your peril.”

In other words, he’s a nice guy until he crosses the white line. But a tough on-field competitor does not equate to grubby tactics, and Trbojevic himself does not feel bereft without a natural knack for getting under everyone’s skin.

“It’s not about that,” Trbojevic says. “It’s just about when you’re out there, you compete to the best of your ability in that 80 minutes. It’s not about being a grub. You do the best you can, you lead the best you can, and that’s all they can ask.”

There is a hint of new-captain naivety upon asking Trbojevic if he will feel comfortable, in the heat of a match, warning his fired-up wingers and front-rowers not to challenge something stupid. “I hadn’t thought about that,” he says. “I’ll have to work on that.”

He is, at least calm. If he played rugby for the All Blacks, Trbojevic would be a “blue head”. New Zealand’s national team define a “blue head” state as one in which a player can maintain control of emotions, clarity of consciousness and situational awareness, and thus avoid poor decision-making in high-pressure situations. They define a “red head” state as being tight, anxious, panicked and desperate.

A player can bring themselves out of the red and into the blue by breathing slowly and deliberately and perhaps using an external cue to reboot. Legendary former All Blacks captain Richie McCaw would apparently stamp his feet. His successor, Kieran Read, would stare at the farthest point in the stadium.

Prince Harry presents Richie McCaw with the Webb Ellis Cup after New Zealand’s 2015 Rugby World Cup final win over Australia at London’s Twickenham Stadium.

Prince Harry presents Richie McCaw with the Webb Ellis Cup after New Zealand’s 2015 Rugby World Cup final win over Australia at London’s Twickenham Stadium.CREDIT: PHIL WALTER

Trbojevic also displays some traits that are common to elite captains, according to Sam Walker’s 2016 book The Captain Class which profiles his 16 greatest sporting teams in history and identifies the counterintuitive leadership qualities of the men and women who led them.

Among them is Syd Coventry, who captained the Collingwood Magpies to four consecutive flags between 1927 and 1930, and Rechelle Hawkes, who led the Hockeyroos to three successive Olympic gold medals between 1988 and 2000. Then there’s Bill Russell (Boston Celtics), Ferenc Puskas (Hungary football team) and Mireya Luis (Cuban volleyball team).

McCaw is on the list, too, having captained New Zealand to the 2011 and 2015 Rugby World Cup wins. He did so after the All Blacks’ disastrous 2007 World Cup campaign, at which they lost their quarter-final to France and McCaw was accused of lacking inspiration and leadership.

It is difficult not to think about Trbojevic when reading the seven common traits: extreme doggedness and focus in competition; aggressive play that tests the limits of the rules; a willingness to do thankless jobs in the shadows; a low-key, practical, and democratic communication style; motivates others with passionate nonverbal displays; strong convictions and the courage to stand apart; ironclad emotional control.
Rechelle Hawkes celebrates as the Hockeyroos beat Argentina to the gold medal at the Sydney 2000 Olympics.

Rechelle Hawkes celebrates as the Hockeyroos beat Argentina to the gold medal at the Sydney 2000 Olympics.CREDIT: NICK FALCONER

Walker references the work of psychologist Carol Dweck, one of the world’s preeminent experts on the subject of how people, especially children, cope with challenge and difficulty. Dweck’s research finds that, contrary to common sense, a person’s self-confidence is not inspired by natural ability but reaction to failure. Applied to sport, it offers a possible explanation for how the best captains - while not the most talented athletes - often exceeded the accomplishments of those with greater gifts.

Their “skills and strategies improved in the face of difficulty”, Walker writes. “Because they viewed their abilities as malleable, and because they were more motivated by learning and improving than by appearing to be capable, they never lost faith.”

Trbojevic, while highly skilled to the tune of 16 Origin games, is also “very coachable”, according to Seibold, which implies a large capacity for continued learning. Retired former Blues skipper Boyd Cordner, who has been observing Trbojevic in NSW camp this week, added weight to this by saying “he’s nervous, but he’s super excited” and endorsed him as the best possible person to take over from Tedesco.

The other fascinating research cited by Walker is a 1913 experiment by French agricultural engineer, Maximilien Ringelmann which explored the dynamic of group effort. Ringelmann asked people to pull on a rope, both individually and in groups, and measured the force they exerted. The group, as expected, did exert more power collectively than they did alone. However, with each new person added, each individual pulled on the rope less hard than they did alone.

Social psychologists later called this phenomenon of putting in less effort when being judged as a group as “social loafing”. In the 1980s, researchers at Fordham University attempted to overcome social loafing by seeing whether one person shouting at a maximum effort could incite others to improve their performances. They grouped shouters in pairs and, before the experiment, told each that their partner was a high-effort performer. Both screamed as hard together as they had alone, suggesting that high effort - or even just the perception of high effort - is transferrable.

The moral of the story? If one player in a team is seen to be giving it their absolute all on the field, it can positively influence the way others in that team perform. “The thing with Jake is he’s remained so consistent, he gives you everything every week,” Trbojevic’s brother and Manly teammate Tom says. “And there’s nothing between his best game and his worst game.”

RELATED ARTICLE​


Opinion​

State of Origin

Purist, obsessive, intense: Why the Michael Maguire I know is an extraordinary competitor

Malcolm Knox

Malcolm Knox

Journalist, author and columnist

Trbojevic says he will “take a little bit from everyone” who has captained him, “but it’s not about changing to be like them, it’s just about being myself”. Paul Gallen, who captained the Blues for 16 of his 24 Origin games including the drought-breaking 2014 series, agreed that Trbojevic would lead the Blues in his own unique way.

“I remember when I first got named I had people saying ‘why don’t you ring so-and-so [to ask] about previous captains?’, and I didn’t want to,” Gallen says. “I just wanted to do my own thing, and I think that’s what he should do. Jake’s his own man; he’s going to be his own captain. His football ability and the way he works on the field is unquestionable.”
 

lsz

First Grader
Staff member
I am not a betting man but if I was then I would have a lazy punt on Teddy for MOM
 

BOZO

Journey Man
Tipping Member
This is the yearly pre Wake NSW Origin thread where NSW Blues Supporters come and pay their last respects before the Blues Burial
Year after year they come on here and their hopes and Dreams are shattered by the Superior Maroons Lead by their Legendary Maroon Leader DCE
1717397014652.png
 

Rackets

Doin' the eagle rock 🦅
Heard on 360 our man Mr 6 agains Klown will be the referee. He must have the goat photos. Seriously he and Sutton, well all of them really have been atrocious this year, but Gee did a great job with the GF and got overlooked. Well done again NRL.
 

The '47ers

When Eagles are silent Parrots begin to chatter
Origin this year will "make or break" Jake's season. We all know how passionate he is, but imagine if Qld win the series, he'll be devastated more than most and vice versa if NSW win he'll be like Schuster in a Maccas buffet.
 
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Ryan

Journey Man
Must say I’m far less invested in SOO these days than I used to be.

Of course I’ll watch it ( from somewhere in the NT on our way to WA) and hope for a Blues win but since moving to QLD almost 20 years ago I now realise there’s a difference between the Maroons & their fans AND the Blues & their fans.

Every single Queenslander becomes totally feral over the next month or so , they are just so invested in their team , even the ones that usually support AFL or one of the other sports.

Shops dress up in their colours , they start flying flags on their cars / trucks , it’s wall to wall and inescapable.

This transcends to their team , and doesn’t matter who is chosen they’ll almost all die for their brothers in arms.

It’s one of the reasons why they’ve been just about unbeaten in a series for the last 15 years ( yes I know they’ve lost a couple but that’s only been when they lost some of their big names to injury ).

It used to be a war , but then the game changed and now it’s just “ another game “ albeit with the best v the best.

I just don’t see the Blues having the same passion and never say die spirit.

And then there’s the affect on the teams and the competition.

I’d much prefer it to be one game , held mid season , on a stand alone weekend.

Indigenous v Māori ( Friday night )
Ladies SOO ( Saturday night )
QLD v NSW ( Sunday night )

Won’t happen but I can dream I guess.

I want your life.
 
Team P W L PD Pts
12 9 3 83 22
14 10 4 78 22
13 9 4 110 20
13 8 5 66 20
13 7 6 81 18
12 7 5 -37 18
13 7 6 133 16
13 7 6 47 16
13 7 6 -34 16
13 6 6 27 15
13 6 6 26 15
14 7 7 -26 14
13 6 7 -47 14
13 4 9 -111 10
12 3 9 -123 10
12 3 9 -136 10
12 2 10 -137 8
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