1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.

Manly Sea Eagles coach Geoff Toovey was right to speak his mind

Discussion in 'Rugby League Forum' started by SeaEagle007, Aug 20, 2013.

  1. SeaEagle007

    SeaEagle007 Well-Known Member

    454
    146
    Eagle Vale, Campbelltown
    Ratings:
    +247 / 14
    by Paul Crawley •From: The Daily Telegraph •August 19, 2013 12:00AM

    http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/sport/nrl/manly-sea-eagles-coach-geoff-toovey-was-right-to-speak-his-mind/story-fni3fh9n-1226699450817

    INSTEAD of threatening to fine Geoff Toovey $10,000 for his post-match blow-up the NRL should on Monday investigate themselves - because lack of leadership is what is really costing the game at the moment.
    Toovey is under fire for daring to talk from the heart in the wake of Manly’s controversial loss to the Rabbitohs.

    Toovey had the audacity to question the performance of the match officials when his team were caned 10-5 in the penalty count - and had a controversial “no try” ruling go against Steve Matai that could have won Manly the game.

    Toovey also labelled Jeff Lima’s disgraceful leg-twist on Anthony Watmough “suspicious”, and brought up the growing trend of “diving” that is driving everyone mad, not just Toovey.

    But judging by what Todd Greenberg said in The Sunday Telegraph, the NRL don’t want coaches showing emotion after matches anymore, they just want them to talk like they are part of the game’s publicity department.



    We were all hoping that when Greenberg arrived at league headquarters the former Bulldogs’ boss could start with putting some football-sense back in the joint.

    But Greenberg said of the controversy that has followed Friday night’s game: “We should be talking today about what was an absorbing contest between the Rabbits and Manly … we should be focused on the quality of the contest, the skill … but instead that focus is applied to match officials and in my view that doesn’t grow the game.”

    Grow the game?

    Does watching Lima rip at Watmough’s injured leg “grow the game”? Does watching trainers tell players to stay down after the slightest of head knocks “grow the game”?

    As Toovey said, it is becoming more and more like soccer. The NRL has only itself to blame for this trend because they have failed to address the problem all year.

    .Where it used to be a badge of honour for a player not to show they were hurt, players today are encouraged to stay down because chances are it will result in a penalty.

    We used to ridicule soccer for this tactic, now it’s encouraged in rugby league. And while they will tell us the video ref got the call right on Matai’s “no try”, that doesn’t account for the fact the current interpretation of the rule needs to be amended.

    On Friday night referee Henry Perenara sent Matai’s try up to the video ref as a “no-try” (held-up) - but even though replays suggested momentum carried Matai over the line, the video ref couldn’t overturn the decision because there wasn’t sufficient evidence.

    Freddy Fittler spoke for the majority of footy fans on Channel Nine’s Sunday Footy Show when he offered: “I would have given it a try.”

    As Toovey said: “There’s got to be an investigation into this. Someone has to be accountable for this.”

    As for Matai’s not deciding the game, the Sea Eagles led 10-6 at that point and that would have given them a likely 10-point lead. For anyone to suggest it had no bearing on the final result is ridiculous.

    As for the Lima leg-twist, it was grubby and everyone who has seen it agrees Lima deserves a long suspension for it.

    .Phil Gould said in commentary on the night that tackle was not in the spirit of the game.

    But this third-man-in tackle, where two players hold a bloke up and the other attacks the legs, has been going on for years - and it’s still going on.

    Like Toovey said, everyone knew Watmough went into the game with a knee injury. But NRL guidelines don’t allow coaches to comment on incidents that might go before the match review committee.

    This is madness.

    Isn’t this exactly what Souths coach Michael Maguire did the last time these two teams met when Greg Inglis was dumped on his head on three separate occasions?

    Maguire said at the time: “When you see someone like GI get dropped on his head three times, of course you’ve got to say something. We’ve got to protect our players.”

    For the NRL to suggest coaches should say nothing shows they have lost touch with reality.

    Fans love to sees coaches show passion and speak from the heart - but if the NRL keeps slapping them with $10,000 fines pretty soon coaches won’t even bother turning up at the media conferences.

    Which, by the way, seems to be the tactic the NRL have employed lately - because no one from the NRL was at the media conference in Gosford on Friday night.

    If they were maybe they would understand Toovey made some very good points about "growing the game".
     
  2. Rex

    Rex Well-Known Member

    4,334
    761
    Ratings:
    +2,338 / 60
    Every now and then an article appears in the DT that bucks the trend.

    That article actually made sense.
     
  3. globaleagle

    globaleagle Où est mon chapeau Premium Member 2016 Tipping Competitor

    11,777
    4,704
    Ratings:
    +7,782 / 58
    http://www.couriermail.com.au/sport/nrl/paul-kent-south-sydney-star-greg-ingliss-dive-the-nrls-real-problem-not-geoff-toovey-comments/story-fniabksc-1226700942599



    FORTY years from now old men are going to look back wistfully and, wiping a tear from their watery eyes, talk about the toughness of Greg Inglis.

    He played an entire game with a fat lip, they’ll say.

    They will then go on to tell the grandkiddies that’s how tough the game used to be in 2013, when Inglis went down from a swinging arm - “What’s a swinging arm, grandad?” - and after appropriate treatment by trained medical staff, which took just long enough for a video review, he got up and bravely played on that night against Manly.

    By then the grandads will have long forgot how, later in the night, Geoff Toovey got up and told the rugby league world nine-tenths of what was wrong in the game, and how we could fix it, and yet Toovey was treated with such contempt that all that came from it was a $10,000 fine.
     
  4. HappilyManly

    HappilyManly MWTS Premium Member 2016 Tipping Competitor

    14,788
    5,735
    Freshwater
    Ratings:
    +11,498 / 254
    South Sydney star Greg Inglis's dive the NRL's real problem, not Geoff Toovey comments
    PAUL KENT THE DAILY TELEGRAPH AUGUST 21, 2013 12:00AM

    FORTY years from now old men are going to look back wistfully and, wiping a tear from their watery eyes, talk about the toughness of Greg Inglis.

    He played an entire game with a fat lip, they’ll say.

    They will then go on to tell the grandkiddies that’s how tough the game used to be in 2013, when Inglis went down from a swinging arm - “What’s a swinging arm, grandad?” - and after appropriate treatment by trained medical staff, which took just long enough for a video review, he got up and bravely played on that night against Manly.

    By then the grandads will have long forgot how, later in the night, Geoff Toovey got up and told the rugby league world nine-tenths of what was wrong in the game, and how we could fix it, and yet Toovey was treated with such contempt that all that came from it was a $10,000 fine.

    There is no better man to judge football toughness than Geoff Toovey.

    He was a player who, even swinging right-handed, you couldn’t stop with a baseball bat.

    I’m old enough to remember being there the day Adam MacDougall stomped all over his face and left star-shaped puncture wounds in his cheeks and forehead. Toovey got up and wobbled and rolled, finally got put upright in backplay, and then got on with the game.

    There’s a reason he talks with that raspy voice. It’s what happens when you bust your arse in every play on every day.

    Yet what respect has it earned him within the NRL?

    Not even the courtesy of a raised eyebrow.

    The NRL is heading down a dangerous track and, like its inaction over the wrestling techniques, which it has let become so entrenched in the game that they are now impossible to coach out, if things are not righted soon then heaven knows where the game will end up.

    What happened to football sense?

    Anybody at the game’s coalface knows Toovey was spot on with everything said after the game.

    His complaints were valid.

    Yet the response from the NRL was not an acknowledgment to get it right next time, or even a promise to take a look at it, but a lecture from the game’s new head of football, Todd Greenberg, on how he would prefer coaches using the opportunity to talk up the game’s virtues, and not its failings.

    Last time I checked coaches were paid on wins and losses, not whether the marketing department met quota.

    The good news is that Toovey, who has until Friday to decide whether to dispute the fine, has a clear-cut defence.

    “I accept that emotion is a big part of the our game,” Greenberg told The Australian on Tuesday, “but that is not an excuse for making unwarranted attacks on match officials.”

    It wasn’t unwarranted, Todd. It was emotional, but why is that a sin in the game?

    The deeper question is why does the game look so dimly on Toovey’s public display but allows Jeff Lima to skip with the lightest of sanctions?

    One day, this tackle will end somebody’s career and we will all agree we could have done something earlier, and this was the moment it should have started.

    The day after Lima tried to twist Anthony Watmough’s leg out of its hip socket, with the knee and ankle put under similar stress, former Australian captain Gorden Tallis declared on Triple M that Lima should get “at least” four weeks.

    By way of highlighting how some acts were acceptable in the game, and others were considered a dog act, Tallis recalled his Rampaging Bull days when he took to backslamming players in games.

    Finally, teammate Kevin Walters fronted him and told him to stop.

    “It’s a game of footy,” Tallis said in defence. In other words, you do what you’ve got to do, I’ll do what I’ve got to do.

    Then Allan Langer pulled him aside.

    Finally, Wayne Bennett called Tallis in and told him he could still do the tackle, he just wouldn’t be playing for the Broncos if he did.

    “It wasn’t illegal, but I realised they didn’t like it,” Tallis said.

    Nowadays the rules encourage players to lay down for offences barely above a slap, as in the Inglis tackle, and yet because it is too hard to police they barely treat the Lima tackle, which is at the serious end, for what it is worth.

    Address the perception, not the reality. When you lose control of the situation then control the message.

    Rabbitohs coach Michael Maguire copped the tip when he defended Inglis’s lie down, saying Inglis was not fishing for a penalty but was legitimately hit, and had the fat lip to prove it.

    Come on, Michael.

    That might work in there at the NRL, where they can’t find the pointy end of the football, but it won’t work among real NRL fans.


    Not those that know the game.

    Not those like Toovey, who bled for his fame.
     
  5. Moondog

    Moondog Grey-beard loon Premium Member 2016 Tipping Competitor

    4,996
    1,990
    Hervey Bay
    Ratings:
    +3,525 / 32
    That's it, I've finally gone off the deep end, mad as a two bob watch, off to the droolers ward...
    The DT supporting Toovey? Written by Paul Kent?
    Lock me up, I'm a raving looney...
     
    • Like Like x 1
  6. Hamster Huey

    Hamster Huey Space Invader Premium Member

    1,828
    643
    Ratings:
    +990 / 7
    What a bizarre washup. Normally the DT sets us up for a post-whinge anti-Manly barrage from the fans, but now they are falling over themselves supporting Toovey's spray.

    Crawley is normally level-headed so I wasn't surprised by that, but the follow up by Kent is odd. Is there a sense there that the anti-NRL feeling of the fans is stronger for sales than a Manly bash?

    Even if their intentions are good in this case, it's hard to be convinced of it given previous form by the likes of Kent, Rothfield and Ritchie.
     
  7. BOZO

    BOZO Well-Known Member 2016 Tipping Competitor

    5,337
    1,983
    Ratings:
    +3,842 / 190
    The article sounds convincing to me :D
     
  8. Brissie Kid

    Brissie Kid Well-Known Member

    2,691
    741
    Ratings:
    +827 / 10
    .
     
  9. HappilyManly

    HappilyManly MWTS Premium Member 2016 Tipping Competitor

    14,788
    5,735
    Freshwater
    Ratings:
    +11,498 / 254
    Sea Eagles players happy with support from coach
    JON GEDDES MANLY DAILY AUGUST 21, 2013 5:06PM

    SEA Eagles players have rallied around coach Geoff Toovey for passionately standing up for them after last Friday's controversial loss to South Sydney - an action that saw him slapped with a $10,000 fine.

    And they expressed their concerns about what will happen if people such as Toovey were not allowed to show some emotion and speak their minds.

    "I thought it was refreshing a coach giving his opinion of what he really thinks," star forward Glenn Stewart said.

    "To get the $10,000 fine is probably just going to push everyone down the track of giving the run of the mill answers so no one has any fines.

    "Toovs is a very passionate man and it was good to see him sticking up for us."

    And Stewart said it was very frustrating when people were not able to say what they thought.

    Winger David Williams said it was disappointing there was not a time and place when people could speak their minds.

    "If it's well-constructed and it is relevant I don't see why we can't improve the game by saying what is wrong with it and what needs to be improved,'' the Wolfman said.

    Co-captain Jamie Lyon said hopefully it did not get to the stage where people gave one or two word answers.

    "There was a lot of passion there and I agreed with what he was saying,'' Lyon said of Toovey's straight-shooting comments .

    The champion centre added that he hoped post-match press conferences did not become "a bit of a bore."

    And prop Brenton Lawrence supported Toovey's passion.

    "It is part of the show, people want to see that, if you ask a question you want an honest answer," Lawrence said.

    "I think he gave his honest opinion so I don't see why you can fine someone for that.

    "If that is part of the spectacle of the sport and sport in Australia then let it go.

    "I don't think it is worth $10,000 for putting a foot out of line."
     

Share This Page