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News: Sea Eagles cap plans

Discussion in 'Rugby League Forum' started by ManlyBacker, May 17, 2010.

  1. ManlyBacker

    ManlyBacker Winging it Staff Member

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    <p>MANLY CEO Graham Lowe will take a salary cap proposal to David Gallop next week to allow concessions for clubs with long-term injury losses.</p>


    <a href="http://silvertails.net/news/4786-sea-eagles-cap-plans.html">Read the full article</a>
     
  2. OneEyedEagle

    OneEyedEagle Well-Known Member 2016 Tipping Competitor

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    I was thinking of this a couple of weeks ago while watching the NBA.

    I heard them discuss it that a team can place a player on the injured rooster so the player is not allocated against the cap and it allows the team to go and buy another player while the injured player is out of action.

    It certainly has its merits and should be considered.
     
  3. lsz

    lsz Well-Known Member Staff Member 2016 Tipping Competitor

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    Got to wonder how long before it got rorted (and how it would be policed)

    i.e. two lower tier players being "injured" for the year so you can pursue a higher paid player

    Also what happens the following year?
     
  4. Jatz Crackers

    Jatz Crackers Moderator Staff Member

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    I thought this was going to be an article about quality control for the merchandise cap.
     
  5. willstyles

    willstyles Active Member

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    These are the two biggest concerns with this system, but it's still worth exploring I think.

    What happens the next year? Well, if the player and club can't come to an agreement then the player presumably has to find a new home.

    And as for the rorting....well, yeah, the NFL/NBA etc have fine-tuned their systems to minimise the rorting but it is still a danger. But if a lower-grader gets "injured" then you would only get minimal cap relief because if they aren't in the first grade plans AND have a smaller contract then the ruling powers won't expect teams to be shattered about the loss.
     
  6. deadlyeagle

    deadlyeagle Member

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    i suppose to minimise the rorting there would have to be independent medical tests done to assure that they are injured
     
  7. Jatz Crackers

    Jatz Crackers Moderator Staff Member

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    Wont work for Cooper. He goes down with major complaints in minutes & makes miraculous recoveries in just a day. All around rep time of course.
     
  8. OneEyedEagle

    OneEyedEagle Well-Known Member 2016 Tipping Competitor

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    They have safe guards in place lsz however human nature will always find a way of rorting. From what I understand you can't keep a player indefinitely on the injured list, not 100% certain but the player can be traded
     
  9. SeaEagleRock8

    SeaEagleRock8 Sea Eagle Lach Staff Member Premium Member 2016 Tipping Competitor

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    It would be a step towards even more fluid rosters. Six week contracts. I can imagine a player might get signed for a couple of months at one club, then another. We could even have a player at 3 different clubs in the one season.
     
  10. Utility Player

    Utility Player Well-Known Member

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    Yes the 30 June rule would have to go for sure.

    A team that loses a star player in say round 5 would get a significant advantage over a team that loses a player in say round 23.

    Would the system be pro rata so that if you lost a player on say 260k for the year and he had played 6 games would you only have 200k to spend?

    Well worth exploring but not as simple as it looks.
     
  11. lsz

    lsz Well-Known Member Staff Member 2016 Tipping Competitor

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    Just like the head bin the 80's......

    Agree it has merit just needs some more thought etc
     
  12. OneEyedEagle

    OneEyedEagle Well-Known Member 2016 Tipping Competitor

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    Here is some stuff I have found on how it works in the NBA.

    Can be read at the following link.

    http://members.cox.net/lmcoon/salarycap.htm

    DISABLED PLAYER EXCEPTION -- This exception allows a team which is over the cap to acquire a replacement for a disabled player who will be out for the remainder of that season (if the player is disabled between July 1 and November 30) or the following season (if the player is disabled after November 30). This exception can also be granted in the event of a player's death. This exception can only be used to acquire one player. The maximum salary for the replacement player is 50% of the injured player's salary, or the average salary, whichever is less (see question number 24 for the definition of "average salary"). Approval from the league (based on a determination by an NBA-designated physician) is required for this exception to be used. This exception can be used to sign a free agent, or to create room to accept a salary in trade. When used for trade, the team may acquire a player whose salary (including any trade bonus) is up to 100% of this exception plus $100,000 (not 125%). Also see question number 20 for more information on the availability and use of this exception.

    If a player is disabled between July 1 and November 30, the team must acquire the replacement player within 45 days. If the player is disabled between December 1 and June 30, then the team has until October 1 to sign a replacement. If the disabled player comes back sooner than expected, then he may be activated immediately, and the replacement player is not affected. However, if the disabled player comes back before the exception is used, then the exception is lost.

    Teams sometimes have had difficulty getting the NBA to approve an injury exception. For example, Danny Manning tore an ACL toward the end of the 1997-98 season, yet the NBA did not approve the Suns for this exception. More recently, the Magic did not receive this exception in 2003 for Grant Hill. However, this exception was granted in the 1999 offseason to San Antonio, so they could replace Sean Elliott, who was disabled due to kidney problems. This exception was also granted to Charlotte soon after Bobby Phills was killed.

    Don't confuse this exception with the salary cap relief teams can apply for a year after losing a player to a career-ending injury or death (see question number 54). This exception allows a team to acquire a replacement player. The salary cap relief removes a contract from the books.
     
  13. Central Coast Eagle

    Central Coast Eagle Active Member

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    I don't think looking at the NBA as a guide to how our salary cap should work is a good idea, most of what the storm have done would be allowed in the NBA ( you can go over the salary cap as much as you like to re-sign current players)
     

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