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Mata has been busy -New football academy proposed for Dubbo

Discussion in 'General Discussion Forum' started by Guest, Oct 11, 2006.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

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    Some good news for Dubbo.

    An Aboriginal football academy proposed for western NSW could create a whole generation of Aboriginal rugby league stars with a top notch education, Community Services Minister John Cobb says.

    Mr Cobb, the Member for Parkes, has modelled his proposal on Western Australia's Clontarf Football Academy, based in Perth.

    "Aboriginal kids from all around Western Australia come to Perth to play football there, to do school, it is just such a huge success," Mr Cobb said.

    The under-utilised Warrina Youth Hostel at Dubbo, recently shut down and then re-opened, has been touted as a possible site for the academy.

    Aboriginal Hostels Ltd, owner of Warrina, believes the football academy could save the hostel.

    "We're talking to minister Cobb about getting it up and running. He's pretty enthusiastic to get something going," Aboriginal Hostels general manager Keith Clarke said.

    Clontarf hosts about 160 Aboriginal boys who are given Australian rules training from former AFL stars, including Dale Kickett, while studying at the attached college.

    It has produced Hawthorn's Mark Williams, Richmond's Andrew Krakouer, and the Fremantle Dockers' Michael Johnson.

    "I think it's something we've got to look at, is to how something like that could work over in the eastern states," Mr Cobb said.

    "Obviously in our case it would be rugby league, but a thing like this can work. It's just a magnet to the kids."

    Warrina opened about 10 years ago to accommodate Aboriginal students from western NSW while they attended Dubbo's Delroy High.

    The 36-bed hostel has operated well-below the minimum 70 per cent occupancy rate since then.

    "It was set up as a place in Dubbo which is close to their homes, the kids can visit their parents on the weekends or their parents can visit them," Mr Clarke said.

    "We've only ever had up to about 15 students, it's unsustainable at present. We'd listen to any ideas."
     
  2. Matabele

    Matabele Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, it's a fantastic possibility and it wouldn't be the first time a government minister has taken credit for one of my ideas.

    Now it is a matter of getting Manly's foot firmly in the door to ensure they are the beneficiaries of the stream of talent that is quite likely to flow from the academy.
     
  3. byso

    byso Well-Known Member

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    Is this discrimination?
     
  4. Canteen Worker

    Canteen Worker Well-Known Member 2016 Tipping Competitor

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    You aren't serious? But maybe you are?????

    I suppose refugee camps are discrimination in that they help those that have lost their homes and livelihood!!

    Get a life Byso or a moral consience!!! Fair dinkum.
     
  5. byso

    byso Well-Known Member

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  6. Matabele

    Matabele Well-Known Member

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    Not all segregation is bad.
     
  7. Fluffy

    Fluffy Well-Known Member

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    Technically it is - but so are selective schools, religigous schools, universities, colleges, tafes, sports acadamy's etc etc - many more of them out there for you protest against before this good idea.
     
  8. byso

    byso Well-Known Member

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    Is there an issue with aboriginal kids not getting along with the other kids in the area?

    I would have thought segregating children wouldn't be the answer.

    But an academy for all underprivileged kids would be a great idea
     
  9. PJ

    PJ Well-Known Member

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    I tend to agree with you Byso- from all experiences in a town with a high population of aboriginal children (somes claim to the 'aboriginal' title is doubtful), that sort of segregation doesn't work and only divides the community further.
    I have a couple of good aboriginal mates who work with the youth and they will tell you that things like this that segregate groups do not help- it needs to be open to everyone and they need to work together with ALL the kids- there are plenty of underprivledged kids in country areas who receive no help or support becasue of the fact that they aren't aboriginal.
    Haven't people learnt that this 'us and them' thing does not work and only creates more anomosity.
     
  10. byso

    byso Well-Known Member

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  11. Guest

    Guest Guest

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    Manly will probably have to fight with the likes of souths for the talent that will come from this academy.

    I think that perhaps a 75% aboriginal and 25% other kids ratio might be better and would take away any possibility of it being seen as favouring one section of the community over another.
     
  12. earl

    earl Active Member

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    75% to 25% is favouring one side.
    My daughter has Aboriginal in her(grandfather on her mums side was part of the stolen generation) and I will be abusing all the xtras she is entitled to. And belive me , there are many , many xtras she will get by having a small percentage of aboriginal in her then if she was full Anglo.

    Pj is spot on. There are many disadvantaged children, regardless of race , and all should be looked after.
     
  13. Matabele

    Matabele Well-Known Member

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    When was the last time you lads went to Hopevale or Palm Island?

    I'd rather live in Soweto in 1985.
     
  14. byso

    byso Well-Known Member

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    Do you agree that an academy "needs" to be aboriginal only in Dubbo?

    If so why?
     
  15. Matabele

    Matabele Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I do. My reasons are clearly presented in my proposal on the matter. ;)
     
  16. Matabele

    Matabele Well-Known Member

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    Seriously though, my reasons for thinking it should be specifically for indigenous talent is because I believe they have a genetic advantage, or specific skills set, that would need a specific program to be maximised.

    If you think of some of the greatest ball players in the rugby codes, they are generally indigenous:

    The Ellas
    Lloyd Walker
    Cliff Lyons
    Preston Campbell
    Andrew Walker
    Now Kurtley Beal coming through the ranks.

    My "thesis" is that they have a genetic superiority, a "spacial awareness" that helps them to read the play and identify gaps in broken play, and a sense of timing that most Anglos don't have.

    So if you're going to nurture that talent you need specific programs for it, and probably also a huge need for the teaching of life skills and mentoring to rewire some of the "disadvantage" out of them.

    There are 4 aboriginal kids at Delroy High. They are basically truants and cause all manner of trouble. But put them on a football field and they come alive. They love to play, they have breathtaking skills. I reckon there is scope for them to receive their education entirely via a curriculum delivered on the football field and/or through the study of Rugby League.

    I would have no problems if there was a similar academy for disadvantaged white kids. In fact there should be one. Far better to fund two academies than spend $50,000 per person per year to keep them behind bars later in life.
     
  17. PJ

    PJ Well-Known Member

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    that's just it- one acadamy for "aboriginal kids" and one for "white kids"- read it out aloud and you'll see how ridiculous it sounds, especially in this day and age....how about one acadamy for "kids".
     
  18. byso

    byso Well-Known Member

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    As noble as this sounds Mata. I still don't understand how this segregation can help in the long term. Even if they have these extra ordinary talents.
    Also it shouldn't be solely about trying to produce the next Cliff Lyons but instead knocking out the "victim" mentality that seems to be instilled in them.

    I asked this question before, but you didn't answer it.
    Do the white and black kids get along in the country?
     
  19. Matabele

    Matabele Well-Known Member

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    Byso, do you want a generalisation or specifics?

    The short answer is yes and no - just the same if you asked if white kids got on with white kids.

    You Australians place far too much store on "egalitarianism". It is a nonsense.

    You're great when it comes to the care of spastics, but you are bloody hopeless when it comes to the nurture of gifted people. And you are blind to it.
     
  20. PJ

    PJ Well-Known Member

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    I'll answer this for you- on the most part yes.
    When they don't get along is when outside pressures are involved (as in parents who should know better) and when the kids can't do the same things due to financial restrictions or restrictions placed on kids by a higher authority- this causes jealousy, anomosity and fighting.
    A few years ago there was alot of fighting between aboriginal and white kids but now with changing attitudes and less of an us v them attitude things have changed and people are treating each other as people instead of black and white.
     

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