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Advice

Discussion in 'General Discussion Forum' started by Fluffy, Mar 17, 2008.

  1. Fluffy

    Fluffy Well-Known Member

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    Well today i got majorly stabbed in the back at work.

    I recieved a written warning for not having a spare part ready to go because i had jsut assumed it was right. My predesessor was the one who made the design change but didnt change the mounting brackets to accomodate the change. He sat in on the meeting and agreed it was my fault.

    So how do i deal with him?

    Playground rules or office politics?
     
  2. The Gronk

    The Gronk Well-Known Member

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    Maybe just bring it up with the guy on the side and see what his story is.  If he doesn't show any balls then you could always go higher I guess.

    Only thing I know for sure is that going off your rocker at anyone just makes everything worse. 

    Oh and putting anything in writing can be a bad idea as it can be used against you if not done carefully. 
     
  3. Chip and Chase

    Chip and Chase True Supporter Staff Member Administrator Premium Member 2016 Tipping Competitor

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    I'd give you a written warning for your spelling alone ;)

    This is why I work for myself, as I can't abide office politics and I hate having to rely on incompetents. But back to your question...I'd blindside him at the water cooler with a Perry like shoulder charge.
     
  4. Matabele

    Matabele Well-Known Member

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    Has the predecessor been promoted or moved sideways?  What is his reputation in the workplace?  Does he socialise with management?
     
  5. fLIP

    fLIP UFO Hunter

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    Jeez mate you must work for a bunch of c**ts if they give you a written for 1 mistake, that may not even be your fault.

    I'd work look ahead and see if he's responsible for any other design faults and go over his head with them.
     
  6. clontaago

    clontaago Well-Known Member

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    This is becoming an everday occurence in my job and because I am the customer's only face to face contact, I am the one who is continually apologising and copping the heat for it. I am getting sick of it.

    Fluffy, you are in a pretty tough situation. I would cop the warning sweet and play the game. Then find out where this guy goes at night and have him given a warning of his own.
     
  7. Fro

    Fro Well-Known Member

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    root his missus :)
     
  8. Guest

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    Send a response detailing all the facts about the part and how it was not your fault back to the person who gave you the written warning asking for the warning to be rescinded.

    Your predecessor was happy for you to take the full blame at the meeting so **** him but with the true facts so that the person who gave you the warning knows the full story in writing.

    Make sure you keep all correspondence on file.
     
  9. Dan

    Dan Administrator Staff Member Administrator 2016 Tipping Competitor

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    My honest view on Warnings is if they have even a little bit of grounding, take it on the chin accept your part in it and move on. Learn from it.

    If you honestly don't think it was your fault and it wasn't up to you to check everything etc, then I would ask for a follow up meeting 1 on 1 with the manager and then go through your reasons. Put nothing in writing though make sure you make a good case, fighting a warning can often back fire and end up in more warnings.

    Dan
     
  10. Matabele

    Matabele Well-Known Member

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    I'm with Tookey on this one.  If your employer has made a "statement" of sots it does beg a response.  But make sure the response is watertight and get one or two external parties to read it sto ensure it is dispassionate.

    With respect to Gronk - always do this sort of stuff in writing and keep copies.  Conversations are too easily twisted, misconstrued and it becomes a "he said, I said" scenario too easily. 
     
  11. Guest

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    A written warning is a serious matter and if you keep all correspondence in writing (and keep copies of everything) then if it all turns to **** later on a solicitor will have evidence to defend you if necessary. 

    Once you receive written correspndence containing serious allegations against you then you need to respond in writing. 

    Fluffy - Hope would have a contact or two with an employment solicitor.  Maybe a call to one of them would help you to draft a response?
     
  12. clontaago

    clontaago Well-Known Member

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    Call in the Union.
     
  13. The Gronk

    The Gronk Well-Known Member

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    I'm with Tookey on this one.  If your employer has made a "statement" of sots it does beg a response.  But make sure the response is watertight and get one or two external parties to read it sto ensure it is dispassionate.

    With respect to Gronk - always do this sort of stuff in writing and keep copies.  Conversations are too easily twisted, misconstrued and it becomes a "he said, I said" scenario too easily. 
    [/quote]

    I agree, but the problem of putting something in writing is it can travel far and wide, which could cause trouble if it contains errors/personal issues.  Your point about it being dispassionate and watertight is a good one-if you can ensure this then putting something in writing is unlikely to come back to bite you. 
     
  14. Matabele

    Matabele Well-Known Member

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    I'm with Tookey on this one.  If your employer has made a "statement" of sots it does beg a response.  But make sure the response is watertight and get one or two external parties to read it sto ensure it is dispassionate.

    With respect to Gronk - always do this sort of stuff in writing and keep copies.  Conversations are too easily twisted, misconstrued and it becomes a "he said, I said" scenario too easily. 
    [/quote]

    I agree, but the problem of putting something in writing is it can travel far and wide, which could cause trouble if it contains errors/personal issues.  Your point about it being dispassionate and watertight is a good one-if you can ensure this then putting something in writing is unlikely to come back to bite you. 
    [/quote]

    After 6 years in my current position I think I have finally gotten the message through that I will not make ANY decision in conversation.  Always have a paper trail is my mantra.
     
  15. Jatz Crackers

    Jatz Crackers Moderator Staff Member

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    But only if youve got a bigger dick !

    Otherwise she might suggest you need your own design change.  ;D
     
  16. earl

    earl Active Member

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    I'm with Tookey on this one.  If your employer has made a "statement" of sots it does beg a response.  But make sure the response is watertight and get one or two external parties to read it sto ensure it is dispassionate.

    With respect to Gronk - always do this sort of stuff in writing and keep copies.  Conversations are too easily twisted, misconstrued and it becomes a "he said, I said" scenario too easily. 
    [/quote]

    I agree, but the problem of putting something in writing is it can travel far and wide, which could cause trouble if it contains errors/personal issues.  Your point about it being dispassionate and watertight is a good one-if you can ensure this then putting something in writing is unlikely to come back to bite you. 
    [/quote]

    After 6 years in my current position I think I have finally gotten the message through that I will not make ANY decision in conversation.  Always have a paper trail is my mantra.
    [/quote]
    I completely agree with mata's.
    I have been burnt so many times from managers telling me to do something and when the **** hits the fan , they never said anything at all.
    On the other hand , there is a good reason why after 10 years I am not in management. Because i dont know when to play politics and when I should use logic.
    Managers dont like being told they are wrong , especially by people who are not in management.
     
  17. Matabele

    Matabele Well-Known Member

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    I'm in management.  ;)
     
  18. Fluffy

    Fluffy Well-Known Member

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    Has the predecessor been promoted or moved sideways?  What is his reputation in the workplace?  Does he socialise with management?
    [/quote]

    "promoted", reputation of sitting in the office doing nothing from the workers, managers seem to love him because he can produce a few reports in access 97 of all things
     
  19. Fluffy

    Fluffy Well-Known Member

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    I'm with Tookey on this one.  If your employer has made a "statement" of sots it does beg a response.  But make sure the response is watertight and get one or two external parties to read it sto ensure it is dispassionate.

    With respect to Gronk - always do this sort of stuff in writing and keep copies.  Conversations are too easily twisted, misconstrued and it becomes a "he said, I said" scenario too easily. 
    [/quote]

    I agree, but the problem of putting something in writing is it can travel far and wide, which could cause trouble if it contains errors/personal issues.  Your point about it being dispassionate and watertight is a good one-if you can ensure this then putting something in writing is unlikely to come back to bite you. 
    [/quote]

    After 6 years in my current position I think I have finally gotten the message through that I will not make ANY decision in conversation.  Always have a paper trail is my mantra.
    [/quote]
    I completely agree with mata's.
    I have been burnt so many times from managers telling me to do something and when the S**t hits the fan , they never said anything at all.
    On the other hand , there is a good reason why after 10 years I am not in management. Because i dont know when to play politics and when I should use logic.
    Managers dont like being told they are wrong , especially by people who are not in management.

    [/quote]

    Deep down i think my manager reckons its bull**** as he is not going to submit it to HR for a month and if i imrove he will bin it.

    The bloke who sat in has worked his way up from the floor and started in 93 so has sucked plenty in.

    I have basically decided to play a passive aggressive role in that i am not going to rattle the cage yet every item that should have been fixed before hand i am asking my predecessor for the full information so i can fix it properly through email. Each email gets cc'd to the boss who i already think is starting to catch on.

    As for the original incident, technically i am to blame however if it were done properly, approx 18 months ago there would have been no problem. I am also able to be blamed technically for not having bills of materials for equipment that was commisioned 15 - 20 years ago. Needless to say to catch up everything would be a full time job for 3 months at least.

    Interesting to note though i my incedent will cost us about 50 tonne of product, in Feb we lsot about 300 tonne because of manegerial incompetance, nothing has changed there, probably my fault as well.
     
  20. earl

    earl Active Member

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    I'm with Tookey on this one.  If your employer has made a "statement" of sots it does beg a response.  But make sure the response is watertight and get one or two external parties to read it sto ensure it is dispassionate.

    With respect to Gronk - always do this sort of stuff in writing and keep copies.  Conversations are too easily twisted, misconstrued and it becomes a "he said, I said" scenario too easily. 
    [/quote]

    I agree, but the problem of putting something in writing is it can travel far and wide, which could cause trouble if it contains errors/personal issues.  Your point about it being dispassionate and watertight is a good one-if you can ensure this then putting something in writing is unlikely to come back to bite you. 
    [/quote]

    After 6 years in my current position I think I have finally gotten the message through that I will not make ANY decision in conversation.  Always have a paper trail is my mantra.
    [/quote]
    I completely agree with mata's.
    I have been burnt so many times from managers telling me to do something and when the S**t hits the fan , they never said anything at all.
    On the other hand , there is a good reason why after 10 years I am not in management. Because i dont know when to play politics and when I should use logic.
    Managers dont like being told they are wrong , especially by people who are not in management.

    [/quote]

    Deep down i think my manager reckons its bullS**t as he is not going to submit it to HR for a month and if i imrove he will bin it.

    The bloke who sat in has worked his way up from the floor and started in 93 so has sucked plenty in.

    I have basically decided to play a passive aggressive role in that i am not going to rattle the cage yet every item that should have been fixed before hand i am asking my predecessor for the full information so i can fix it properly through email. Each email gets cc'd to the boss who i already think is starting to catch on.

    As for the original incident, technically i am to blame however if it were done properly, approx 18 months ago there would have been no problem. I am also able to be blamed technically for not having bills of materials for equipment that was commisioned 15 - 20 years ago. Needless to say to catch up everything would be a full time job for 3 months at least.

    Interesting to note though i my incedent will cost us about 50 tonne of product, in Feb we lsot about 300 tonne because of manegerial incompetance, nothing has changed there, probably my fault as well.
    [/quote]
    To accept the blame and learn from it is a big thing. As a child I lied about almost everything but in the real world to accept when you have made mistakes not only speaks volums about yourself but also instills trust from your employer , and this I have learnt from being entrusted with the position I currently hold .
      I know  the reason I am not in management is that I am not trusted with a large budget , not that I would not make a good manager.
        Good luck with your outcome Fluff and I hope all works out well.
     

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